Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. From rescue to recovery? It's not as simple as that, George (Independent)

Labour’s position in relation to spending is more astute than the Chancellor suggests, writes Steve Richards. 

2. Balls appeals to the few, Osborne the many (Guardian)

Labour's attack on the chancellor's spending plans is smart, but will only work with those who have made their minds up, says Martin Kettle. 

3. Julia Gillard: Sadly, this lady was for turning (Independent)

As with Thatcher, she had become an electoral liability to her party, writes Geoffrey Robertson.

4. Soon, we are likely to need a braver chancellor than this one (Daily Telegraph)

Osborne is good at the politics, but flunks the economics, writes Peter Oborne. For how long can this continue?

5. George Osborne master of the game of divisive politics (Guardian)

The Chancellor has tried to gloss over a dire financial situation by playing the game he knows best, writes Jonathan Freedland. 

6. Gordon Brown's plans to join the euro (Daily Telegraph)

The great saviour of the pound actually toyed with ditching it, says Sue Cameron.

7. On the spectrum of deceit, ministers have gone off the scale (Guardian)

Statistics have long been argued one way or the other, but this government twists them beyond reality to suit its ruthless agenda, writes Zoe Williams.

8. Shock horror: Britain less secretive than ever (Times)

Revelations about police subterfuge and the alleged CQC cover-up show how much more open we are as a society, says David Aaronovitch. 

9. Osborne sets a trap for Labour on welfare (Financial Times)

Sticking to the government’s benefits cap will torture the opposition, writes Janan Ganesh.

10. Can the state be trusted to do anything right? (Daily Telegraph)

Revelations of unacceptable snooping and the draconian treatment of whistleblowers are making a mockery of the government's quest for 'transparency', says Allison Pearson.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.