Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. From rescue to recovery? It's not as simple as that, George (Independent)

Labour’s position in relation to spending is more astute than the Chancellor suggests, writes Steve Richards. 

2. Balls appeals to the few, Osborne the many (Guardian)

Labour's attack on the chancellor's spending plans is smart, but will only work with those who have made their minds up, says Martin Kettle. 

3. Julia Gillard: Sadly, this lady was for turning (Independent)

As with Thatcher, she had become an electoral liability to her party, writes Geoffrey Robertson.

4. Soon, we are likely to need a braver chancellor than this one (Daily Telegraph)

Osborne is good at the politics, but flunks the economics, writes Peter Oborne. For how long can this continue?

5. George Osborne master of the game of divisive politics (Guardian)

The Chancellor has tried to gloss over a dire financial situation by playing the game he knows best, writes Jonathan Freedland. 

6. Gordon Brown's plans to join the euro (Daily Telegraph)

The great saviour of the pound actually toyed with ditching it, says Sue Cameron.

7. On the spectrum of deceit, ministers have gone off the scale (Guardian)

Statistics have long been argued one way or the other, but this government twists them beyond reality to suit its ruthless agenda, writes Zoe Williams.

8. Shock horror: Britain less secretive than ever (Times)

Revelations about police subterfuge and the alleged CQC cover-up show how much more open we are as a society, says David Aaronovitch. 

9. Osborne sets a trap for Labour on welfare (Financial Times)

Sticking to the government’s benefits cap will torture the opposition, writes Janan Ganesh.

10. Can the state be trusted to do anything right? (Daily Telegraph)

Revelations of unacceptable snooping and the draconian treatment of whistleblowers are making a mockery of the government's quest for 'transparency', says Allison Pearson.

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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.