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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Can Miliband and Balls discover Attlee’s steel? (Daily Telegraph)

Labour's Iron Eds will soon know whether the voters are swayed by their moment of truth, says Mary Riddell.

2. America owes a lot to Bernanke (Financial Times)

Fed critics lack imagination or are indifferent to what would have happened had it not acted, writes Martin Wolf.

3. He’s beating the Blob, but Gove won’t be PM (Times)

The Education Secretary’s radicalism knows no bounds, unlike his political ambition, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. When – not if – China overtakes the US, normality will have returned (Independent)

The possibility that China's economy will outgrow America's in the next three years gives added spice to Obama's meeting with President Xi Jinping, writes Hamish McRae.

5. Ed Balls is as mesmerised by the bankers as George Osborne (Guardian)

Austerity has lost its credibility everywhere but London and Berlin, writes Simon Jenkins. The shadow chancellor missed a golden opportunity.

6. Curry Club Conservatives can spice things up (Daily Telegraph)

Why are Tory MPs who can help win the next election ignored by the party leadership, asks Isabel Hardman.

7. They’ve all discovered the economic big idea (Times)

Industrial policy is back in vogue, but will its new incarnation succeed where earlier attempts to stop decline failed, asks Daniel Finkelstein.

8. How to destroy the future (Guardian)

From the Cuban missile crisis to a fossil fuels frenzy, the US is intent on winning the race to disaster, says Noam Chomsky.

9. At all costs, our museums must remain free (Independent)

Other ways to close the funding gap must be found, says an Independent editorial.

10. Great powers’ ties hinge on the Pacific (Financial Times)

The US and China have an opportunity to set out aims and test limits, writes Robert Zoellick.

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