Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. As Labour's iron man, Ed Balls could do the trick (Guardian)

The tough-as-titanium spending plan Ed Balls laid out could clinch an election, says Polly Toynbee. Can Ed Miliband provide matching vision?

2. George Osborne was the future once - now Michael Gove drives the Tories on (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor has been supplanted as the party’s most effective political playmaker, writes Benedict Brogan.

3. Talk of recovery in Greece is premature – and all about justifying austerity (Guardian)

Few think Athens could go a day outside the sovereign version of debtor's jail, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

4. It’s not a register we need to keep politics honest. It’s a free press (Independent)

Despite what Nick Clegg thinks, a statutory regulator of lobbyists would not have prevented Patrick Mercer's own spectacular folly, writes John Rentoul.

5. Obama and Xi must halt a risky rivalry (Financial Times)

The real difficulty is over the Chinese desire to carve out a ‘sphere of influence’ in east Asia, writes Gideon Rachman.

6. Balls uses the ‘d-word’. But it’s just a first step (Times)

The shadow chancellor has acknowledged the deficit, writes Rachel Sylvester. Even so, economic credibility is still a long way off for Labour.

7. Hubris and nemesis, with a Turkish accent (Daily Telegraph)

Recep Erdogan’s style of politics lies at the heart of his problems at home and abroad, says Shashank Joshi. 

8. Politics catches up with age of austerity (Financial Times)

Britain may finally be able to have a strategic conversation about what government is for, says Janan Ganesh.

9. Case of Bradley Manning is not America's finest hour (Independent)

While Manning behaved recklessly, his treatment has been a disgrace, says an Independent editorial. 

10. Here's how Ukip would clean up Westminster's act on lobbying (Guardian)

The Conservatives, Lib Dems and Labour have done little to end sleaze scandals, says Nigel Farage. They're all in hock to lobbyists.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Show Hide image

What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.