Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Does the Tory party actually want to win the next election? (Observer)

An 'alternative Queen's speech' by rightwingers illustrates David Cameron's enduring problems with his MPs, argues Andrew Rawnsley.

2. With Middle Eastern moderates like these, who needs extremists? (Sunday Times) (£)

In relation to the Iranian elections, he word of the week is “moderate”, says Dominic Lawson.

3. Recovery means... dumping Labour policies (Independent on Sunday)

Protected by the amulet of Saint Clem, Ed Miliband could go on to bury John Maynard Keynes, says John Rentoul.

4. George Osborne's spending review should focus on boosting growth and living standards (Sunday Mirror)

Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls explains how growth now would head off deeper cuts in 2015.

5. You may laugh at 'Jeffrey’, but he’s won the argument (Sunday Telegraph)

George Osborne has defined the rules of the game and the terms of the debate, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

6. Blame austerity, not old people, for the plight of Britain's young (Observer)

We have to refashion our economic model so that it works for everyone – particularly the young, says Will Hutton.

7. It’s dangerous to ignore the bridesmaids, PM (Sunday Times) (£)

No 10's female staff are treated more like admirers than advisers, writes Adam Boulton.

8. A little interference is a wonderful thing (Independent on Sunday)

The Government's sudden desire to make new rules and enforce old ones is overdue, writes D J Taylor.

9. Scotland's an enlightened country – unless you're female (Observer)

Scotland beats England in its compassionate ways. Just a shame about the misogyny, writes Kevin McKenna.

10. Back together: me, Fatboy Slim and the rest of the Upwardly Mobile Gang (Sunday Times) (£)

I became a grammar-school boy — and it will never leave me, says Andrew Sullivan.

 

Show Hide image

Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland