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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Don't underestimate Obama and Merkel. These are serious leaders for perilous times (Independent)

Their recent joint appearance showed how much these two leaders have in common, but this introspection is often seen as dithering, writes Mary Dejevsky. 

2. Brazil is saying what we could not: we don't want these costly extravaganzas (Guardian)

From the World Cup to the G8, many countries are paying an extortionate price for hosting these pointless displays, writes Simon Jenkins.

3. British bank reform needs to go further (Financial Times)

An industry that has taken the public for a ride must be made to change its ways, says Martin Wolf.

4. Tories are fighting for people Labour has abandoned (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Miliband’s policy on welfare reform and free schools is to leave the working classes to their fate, argues Fraser Nelson.

5. I argued for the arts – and won. We will keep the philistines from the gates (Guardian)

I love Britain's creative industries, but as culture secretary I make no apology for making the economic case, says Maria Miller. 

6. A US bomb will not stop an Iranian one (Financial Times)

No one imagines the change of president offers a get-out-of-jail card, but it does open a door, writes Philip Stephens.

7. Food Fight (Times)

Europe’s refusal to embrace GM crops is hypocritical, anti-scientific and potentially disastrous for the developing world, says a Times editorial.

8. As the US soars, the eurozone slumps (Daily Telegraph)

François Hollande is deluding himself if he thinks the crisis in the eurozone is over, writes Jeremy Warner.

9. Ian Brady is bad, not mad. Let him die if he wants (Times)

Insanity is difficult to define, writes Philip Collins. But we should not keep the Moors murderer alive just to prolong his punishment.

10. Why NSA surveillance is a threat to British doctors and lawyers (Guardian)

Professionals using cloud services will have to guard against patients and clients being snooped on, writes Ross Anderson.