Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Intervention: too much of it abroad, not enough of it at home (Independent)

The mark of the liberal interventionist is a mix of faith in the state, and scepticism about it, writes Steve Richards.

2. Keep out, they say. But then comes cataclysm (Times)

If Assad, Russia and Hezbollah win the civil war in Syria, the rest of the world is likely to pay a heavy price, writes David Aaronovitch.

3. Mervyn King: goodbye to the governor (Guardian)

The British economy was in for a painful recession in 2008-09; but through his inaction, Sir Mervyn made it worse, says a Guardian editorial.

4. Britain’s banks are still a danger to the real economy (Financial Times)

Is the UK economy now protected from the City? The simple answer is no, says Chris Giles.

5. The Tories will never triumph with five chairmen at the helm (Daily Telegraph)

The party organisation is a total mess – but Boris Johnson could restore clarity, writes Peter Oborne.

6. Our love for the NHS blinds us to its failures. Morecambe Bay is yet another wake up call (Independent)

There have been too many hospital scandals where trusts promise to ‘learn the lessons’, writes Jane Merrick. 

7. Be true to yourself. Is this really the best the Guides can do for girls? (Guardian)

The schmaltzy motto embedded in the organisation's new oath is more likely to build insecure narcissism than help girls develop, writes Zoe Williams. 

8. Big Steel is a very big problem for China (Financial Times)

Wisco is a large part of an ailing, inefficient industry that Beijing appears unable to discipline, writes John Gapper.

9. Our banks are not merely out of control. They're beyond control (Guardian)

Jailing reckless bankers is a dangerously incomplete solution, says Joris Luyendijk. The market is bust. 

10. The populists reshaping Westminster politics (Daily Telegraph)

Say goodbye to the dinosaurs, people like Margaret Hodge, chairman of the Commons public accounts committee, are making the weather, says Sue Cameron.

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Casting the Brexit movie that is definitely real and will totally happen

Details are yet unclear as to whether The Bad Boys of Brexit will be gracing our screens, or just Farage's vivid imagination.

Hollywood is planning to take on the farcical antics of Nigel Farage et al during the UK referendum, according to rumours (some suspect planted by a starstruck Brexiteer). 

Details are yet unclear as to whether The Bad Boys of Brexit will be gracing our big or small screens, a DVD, or just Farage's vivid imagination, but either way here are our picks for casting the Hollywood adaptation.

Nigel Farage: Jim Carrey

The 2018 return of Alan Partridge as "the voice of hard Brexit" makes Steve Coogan the obvious choice. Yet Carrey's portrayal of the laughable yet pure evil Count Olaf in A Series of Unfortunate Events makes him a serious contender for this role. 

Boris Johnson: Gerard Depardieu

Stick a blonde wig on him and the French acting royalty is almost the spitting image of our own European aristocrat. He has also evidently already mastered the look of pure shock necessary for the final scene of the movie - in which the Leave campaign is victorious.

Arron Banks: Ricky Gervais

Ricky Gervais not only resembles Ukip donor Arron Banks, but has a signature shifty face perfect for the scene where the other Brexiteers ask him what is the actual plan. 

Gerry Gunster: Anthony Lapaglia

The Bad Boys of Brexit will reportedly be told from the perspective of the US strategist turned Brexit referendum expert Gerry Gunster. Thanks to recurring roles in both the comedy stalwart Frasier, and the US crime drama Without a Trace, Anthony Lapaglia is versatile enough to do funny as well as serious, a perfect mix for a story that lurches from tragedy to farce. Also, they have the same cunning eyes.

Douglas Carswell: Mark Gatiss

The resemblance is uncanny.

David Cameron: Andrew Scott

Andrew Scott is widely known for his portrayal of Moriarty in Sherlock, where he indulges in elaborate, but nationally destructive strategy games. The actor also excels in a look of misplaced confidence that David Cameron wore all the way up to the referendum. Not to mention, his forehead is just as shiny. He'll have to drink a lot of Bollinger to gain that Cameron-esque puppy fat though. 

Kate Hoey: Judi Dench

Although this casting would ruin the image of the much beloved national treasure that is Judi Dench, if anyone can pull off being the face of Labour Leave, the incredible actress can.