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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Intervention: too much of it abroad, not enough of it at home (Independent)

The mark of the liberal interventionist is a mix of faith in the state, and scepticism about it, writes Steve Richards.

2. Keep out, they say. But then comes cataclysm (Times)

If Assad, Russia and Hezbollah win the civil war in Syria, the rest of the world is likely to pay a heavy price, writes David Aaronovitch.

3. Mervyn King: goodbye to the governor (Guardian)

The British economy was in for a painful recession in 2008-09; but through his inaction, Sir Mervyn made it worse, says a Guardian editorial.

4. Britain’s banks are still a danger to the real economy (Financial Times)

Is the UK economy now protected from the City? The simple answer is no, says Chris Giles.

5. The Tories will never triumph with five chairmen at the helm (Daily Telegraph)

The party organisation is a total mess – but Boris Johnson could restore clarity, writes Peter Oborne.

6. Our love for the NHS blinds us to its failures. Morecambe Bay is yet another wake up call (Independent)

There have been too many hospital scandals where trusts promise to ‘learn the lessons’, writes Jane Merrick. 

7. Be true to yourself. Is this really the best the Guides can do for girls? (Guardian)

The schmaltzy motto embedded in the organisation's new oath is more likely to build insecure narcissism than help girls develop, writes Zoe Williams. 

8. Big Steel is a very big problem for China (Financial Times)

Wisco is a large part of an ailing, inefficient industry that Beijing appears unable to discipline, writes John Gapper.

9. Our banks are not merely out of control. They're beyond control (Guardian)

Jailing reckless bankers is a dangerously incomplete solution, says Joris Luyendijk. The market is bust. 

10. The populists reshaping Westminster politics (Daily Telegraph)

Say goodbye to the dinosaurs, people like Margaret Hodge, chairman of the Commons public accounts committee, are making the weather, says Sue Cameron.