Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband is standing firm on Syria, but is he caught in a trap? (Daily Telegraph)

Labour is haunted by Iraq, but doing nothing as catastrophe unfolds brings its own risks, writes Mary Riddell.

2. The toxic legacy of the Greek crisis (Financial Times)

That Greece was the first to fall into trouble gave weight to the view that the crisis was fiscal, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Big ideas can be bad ideas - even in the age of the thinktank (Guardian)

Forget the US model. British academics should aspire to offer more than just intellectual fig leaves for policymakers, writes Mark Mazower.

4. What’s to be gained from arming the rebels? (Times)

Whether or not Britain takes sides in Syria, these are the issues facing military analysts, writes Roger Boyes.

5. Britain's response to the NSA story? Back off and shut up (Guardian)

Snowden's revelations are causing outrage in the US, writes Simon Jenkins. In the UK, Hague deploys a police-state defence and the media is silenced.

6. We must never forget our debt to America (Times)

Ahead of Barack Obama’s speech in Berlin we should remember that the US made the choice to protect Europe, says Daniel Finkelstein.

7. Russia has mixed motives in Syria (Financial Times)

To ordinary people, a defeat of the rebels is seen as a victory over the west, writes Andrei Nekrasov.

8. Did Stuart Hall's victims relive their agony just for this? (Daily Mail)

Hall's lenient sentence shows judges learnt nothing from Savile, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. Co-op structures don’t solve all management issues (Independent)

We must make the shareholder-owned model work as well as possible, says Hamish McRae.

10. It's now time we reaped the rewards of GM crops (Daily Telegraph)

A disastrous harvest ahead and poor productivity mean farmers need all the help they can get, says Philip Johnston.

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Watch: The evidence Nigel Farage said money sent to the EU should go to the NHS

After the EU referendum result, Nigel Farage said it was a "mistake" for Leave to suggest funds could go to the NHS. But what's this?

Remember Friday? (I know: it's not necessarily a pleasant thing to do, but bear with me.) On Friday, hours after the result of the EU referendum was announced, Nigel Farage appeared on Good Morning Britain and said that the Leave campaign advertising which linked the extra "£350m a week" Brexit would allegedly gift us with the NHS was a "mistake".

Sure, it was on posters, and emblazoned on a bus, and he didn't speak up to disabuse anyone of the notion. But let's give Farage the benefit of the doubt and pretend he does sorely regret the fact that, through no fault of his own, members of the electorate may have been led to believe that that money would be put into healthcare. It must be tough, when you ought to be high on your victory, to have to answer for other people's mistakes

Ah. Hold that thought.

It looks like the Independent has unearthed a video of Nigel Farage on television before the vote, and  strange thing  he tells Hilary Benn that the money currently being sent to Europe should be spent on, er, "schools, hospitals and the NHS".

Well, this mole isn't sure what to say. Maybe Farage doesn't remember this specific moment? Maybe when he said "schools, hospitals and the NHS" he actually meant something different, like "negotiating our exit from the EU", or "paying to access the common market despite no longer being a member"? Or maybe when he said that money should be spent on these things, he didn't mean it necessarily would be, and it would have been entirely unreasonable for the voting public to make such an absurd leap?

All I can suggest is that you watch and decide for yourself, dear reader.

I'm a mole, innit.