Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband is standing firm on Syria, but is he caught in a trap? (Daily Telegraph)

Labour is haunted by Iraq, but doing nothing as catastrophe unfolds brings its own risks, writes Mary Riddell.

2. The toxic legacy of the Greek crisis (Financial Times)

That Greece was the first to fall into trouble gave weight to the view that the crisis was fiscal, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Big ideas can be bad ideas - even in the age of the thinktank (Guardian)

Forget the US model. British academics should aspire to offer more than just intellectual fig leaves for policymakers, writes Mark Mazower.

4. What’s to be gained from arming the rebels? (Times)

Whether or not Britain takes sides in Syria, these are the issues facing military analysts, writes Roger Boyes.

5. Britain's response to the NSA story? Back off and shut up (Guardian)

Snowden's revelations are causing outrage in the US, writes Simon Jenkins. In the UK, Hague deploys a police-state defence and the media is silenced.

6. We must never forget our debt to America (Times)

Ahead of Barack Obama’s speech in Berlin we should remember that the US made the choice to protect Europe, says Daniel Finkelstein.

7. Russia has mixed motives in Syria (Financial Times)

To ordinary people, a defeat of the rebels is seen as a victory over the west, writes Andrei Nekrasov.

8. Did Stuart Hall's victims relive their agony just for this? (Daily Mail)

Hall's lenient sentence shows judges learnt nothing from Savile, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. Co-op structures don’t solve all management issues (Independent)

We must make the shareholder-owned model work as well as possible, says Hamish McRae.

10. It's now time we reaped the rewards of GM crops (Daily Telegraph)

A disastrous harvest ahead and poor productivity mean farmers need all the help they can get, says Philip Johnston.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.