Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband is standing firm on Syria, but is he caught in a trap? (Daily Telegraph)

Labour is haunted by Iraq, but doing nothing as catastrophe unfolds brings its own risks, writes Mary Riddell.

2. The toxic legacy of the Greek crisis (Financial Times)

That Greece was the first to fall into trouble gave weight to the view that the crisis was fiscal, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Big ideas can be bad ideas - even in the age of the thinktank (Guardian)

Forget the US model. British academics should aspire to offer more than just intellectual fig leaves for policymakers, writes Mark Mazower.

4. What’s to be gained from arming the rebels? (Times)

Whether or not Britain takes sides in Syria, these are the issues facing military analysts, writes Roger Boyes.

5. Britain's response to the NSA story? Back off and shut up (Guardian)

Snowden's revelations are causing outrage in the US, writes Simon Jenkins. In the UK, Hague deploys a police-state defence and the media is silenced.

6. We must never forget our debt to America (Times)

Ahead of Barack Obama’s speech in Berlin we should remember that the US made the choice to protect Europe, says Daniel Finkelstein.

7. Russia has mixed motives in Syria (Financial Times)

To ordinary people, a defeat of the rebels is seen as a victory over the west, writes Andrei Nekrasov.

8. Did Stuart Hall's victims relive their agony just for this? (Daily Mail)

Hall's lenient sentence shows judges learnt nothing from Savile, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. Co-op structures don’t solve all management issues (Independent)

We must make the shareholder-owned model work as well as possible, says Hamish McRae.

10. It's now time we reaped the rewards of GM crops (Daily Telegraph)

A disastrous harvest ahead and poor productivity mean farmers need all the help they can get, says Philip Johnston.

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I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.