The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. We’ve left it too late to save Syria – this conflict can never be won (Daily Telegraph)

It would be madness to arm the rebels in what has become a brutal religious war, says Boris Johnson.

2. Iran has changed course. Now the US must do the same (Guardian)

Hassan Rouhani's election victory can help ease tension in the Middle East and with the United States, writes Jonathan Steele.

3. Iran's new leader offers hope for the region (Daily Telegraph)

Hassan Rowhani is politically astute, and has a vision for a more moderate regime , writes Jack Straw.

4. The best way to fight the EDL's anti-Muslim bigotry is by showing solidarity on the streets (Independent)

This racist group has been indulged by Britain's mainstream media, writes Owen Jones. We need to drown them out.

5. Boris the bold can be the Tories’ salvation (Times)

The Mayor is no standard-issue Conservative, says Tim Montgomerie. He has an Olympic-sized belief in the positive power of a strong state.

6. The red lines over Syria have not been crossed (Guardian)

The country is already awash with weapons, which are at the limit of what can be safely given to the rebels, writes Alastair Crooke.

7. West must be cautious over Iran election (Financial Times)

Embracing Hassan Rohani too warmly could hinder nuclear negotiations, writes Martin Indyk.

8. The Treasury must come clean over Lloyds (Times)

A failed Co-op bid that looked odd from the start raises suspicions of ministerial interference, writes David Davis.

9. The whistleblowers are the new generation of American patriots (Guardian)

The violation of civil liberties in the name of security has had a profound impact on those who came of age after 9/11, says Gary Younge. 

10. Obama needs to embrace the promise of the US city (Financial Times)

The US president could do a great deal more to embrace the city as the chief magnet and incubator of the intellectual capital his country needs, writes Edward Luce.

12 issues for £12