Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Think brain scans can reveal our innermost thoughts? Think again (Guardian)

Increasing claims for neuroscience – that it can locate jealousy or Muslim fundamentalism – are ludicrous, writes Raymond Tallis

2. Britain can no longer afford to bankroll the rich  (Guardian)

Not only is the ever-growing wealth of the super-rich not trickling down, it is creating ever-growing instability in a future not worth having, writes Nick Cohen

3. Will we ever really know why people turn to terrorism? (Guardian)

We need to ask what leads a person to rationalise an act of murder and see themselves as above the law, writes Peter Beaumont

4. Hate mustn’t be made a thought crime – only acting on it is (Telegraph)

Words must be regarded differently in law from acts. It distinguishes a free nation from a totalitarian one, writes Janet Daley

5. Patrick Mercer: A rogue operator, or a return to the days of Tory sleaze? (Telegraph)

For the Prime Minister’s allies, Patrick Mercer’s disgrace is positively karmic, says Matthew d’Ancona

6. Cuts, BBC? What cuts?   (Telegraph)

What neither the Chancellor nor the BBC want to admit is that public spending is still racing upwards, says Christopher Booker

7. France is marching against markets   (FT)

Gay marriage is the cherished priority of an elite-driven political system, writes Christopher Caldwell

8. Hassan Nasrallah, Hizbollah leader (FT)

The militia chief’s backing for the Assad regime could ignite a bigger conflict, says David Gardner

9. China, Baby 59, and national self-deception (Independent)

The mother deserves sympathy, the state scrutiny, writes Memphis Barker

10. Sorry James Salter, if a book's any good, the best lines will linger (Independent)

And you can quote me on that, writes Tom Sutcliffe

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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