Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Think they can't axe David Cameron? Don't bet on it (Daily Mail)

If the Prime Minister's refusal to change policies looks like bringing certain defeat, the Tories will dump him, writes Simon Heffer.

2. Britain should lead in Europe, not leave it (Financial Times)

Isolation would make us weaker and poorer, writes Michael Heseltine.

3. Signs of Recovery (Times)

Data suggests evidence of an upturn, notes a Times leader. The government must ease the conditions for investment-led growth.

4. Prince Charles is a danger to democracy – even when I agree with him (Guardian)

I support Charles's views on climate change, but still believe he should stay silent – as the Queen probably does, says Peter Wilby.

5. The Syrian dilemma: inch by inch, the west gets involved in an internecine civil war (Independent)

Even if there is a breakthrough, Jabhat al-Nusra and its allies have stated clearly that they will have no truck with negotiations, writes Kim Sengupta.

6. Raised voices do not convince me on Europe (Times)

It is hard to share the certainties of either side in the in-out argument, writes Matthew Parris. We don’t-knows deserve better.

7. David Cameron would like to forget gay marriage, but it will haunt him (Daily Telegraph)

The coalition alters mankind’s most important social structure at its peril, writes Charles Moore.

8. Labour and coalition: Talking time (Guardian)

It is not too early to hope that some better preparatory work than last time is already in train, not least on the personal level, says a Guardian editorial.

9. Don’t get cross about the old man's network - get even (Daily Telegraph)

Instead of resenting the injustice of internships, maximise a child's chances by teaching them to read and write, says Graeme Archer.

10. Proof that leaders need to look the part (Financial Times)

We expect successful people to be attractive, writes Tim Harford.

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What do Labour's lost voters make of the Labour leadership candidates?

What does Newsnight's focus group make of the Labour leadership candidates?

Tonight on Newsnight, an IpsosMori focus group of former Labour voters talks about the four Labour leadership candidates. What did they make of the four candidates?

On Andy Burnham:

“He’s the old guard, with Yvette Cooper”

“It’s the same message they were trying to portray right up to the election”​

“I thought that he acknowledged the fact that they didn’t say sorry during the time of the election, and how can you expect people to vote for you when you’re not actually acknowledging that you were part of the problem”​

“Strongish leader, and at least he’s acknowledging and saying let’s move on from here as opposed to wishy washy”

“I was surprised how long he’d been in politics if he was talking about Tony Blair years – he doesn’t look old enough”

On Jeremy Corbyn:

"“He’s the older guy with the grey hair who’s got all the policies straight out of the sixties and is a bit of a hippy as well is what he comes across as” 

“I agree with most of what he said, I must admit, but I don’t think as a country we can afford his principles”

“He was just going to be the opposite of Conservatives, but there might be policies on the Conservative side that, y’know, might be good policies”

“I’ve heard in the paper he’s the favourite to win the Labour leadership. Well, if that was him, then I won’t be voting for Labour, put it that way”

“I think he’s a very good politician but he’s unelectable as a Prime Minister”

On Yvette Cooper

“She sounds quite positive doesn’t she – for families and their everyday issues”

“Bedroom tax, working tax credits, mainly mum things as well”

“We had Margaret Thatcher obviously years ago, and then I’ve always thought about it being a man, I wanted a man, thinking they were stronger…  she was very strong and decisive as well”

“She was very clear – more so than the other guy [Burnham]”

“I think she’s trying to play down her economics background to sort of distance herself from her husband… I think she’s dumbing herself down”

On Liz Kendall

“None of it came from the heart”

“She just sounds like someone’s told her to say something, it’s not coming from the heart, she needs passion”

“Rather than saying what she’s going to do, she’s attacking”

“She reminded me of a headteacher when she was standing there, and she was quite boring. She just didn’t seem to have any sort of personality, and you can’t imagine her being a leader of a party”

“With Liz Kendall and Andy Burnham there’s a lot of rhetoric but there doesn’t seem to be a lot of direction behind what they’re saying. There seems to be a lot of words but no action.”

And, finally, a piece of advice for all four candidates, should they win the leadership election:

“Get down on your hands and knees and start praying”

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.