Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Stay in the EU. It’s clearly in our interests (Times)

Europe isn’t perfect but we would be wrong to leave the world’s biggest trading bloc, argues Alistair Darling.

2. We doctors worry about NHS failings, too (Daily Telegraph)

Hospital A&Es are at breaking point, and it’s no use blaming the patients, says Sarah Wollaston.

3. The time for a British decision is now (Financial Times)

It is doubtful London could remain the continent’s financial capital if the UK quit the EU, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Labour must stand firm: no to a referendum on Europe (Guardian)

Out-of-office Tories have Cameron in a corner, writes Polly Toynbee. But Miliband should ignore calls to hold a futile and distracting in-out vote.

5. Our universities should take a lesson from the land of the free (Daily Telegraph)

Britain and the US have chosen two very different models for funding universities – and it’s clear which is winning, says Fraser Nelson.

6. Despite the cynics, don’t give up on politics (Times)

Alan Johnson’s memoir of childhood poverty is a reminder that our leaders are not all from an out-of-touch elite, says Philip Collins.

7. The new Archbishop should stop this gesture politics (Independent)

Justin Welby should seize the opportunity to totally reshape the role of bishops in the House of Lords, says Frank Field. 

8. Probation cannot be solved by a minister in a hurry (Guardian)

Reforming probation is too important to be jeopardised by a rush to results for partisan political purposes, says a Guardian editorial.

9. George Osborne's hair of the dog that bit us (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor wants a mini-boom to restore growth, but that’s what got us into this mess, writes Jeremy Warner. 

10. Alex Ferguson's hairdryer treatment won't cut it in politics (Guardian)

The Manchester United boss has been wildly lauded for his success on the pitch, writes Simon Jenkins. Those who govern us don't have it so easy.

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Indie band The 1975 want to “sue the government” over the Electoral Commission’s latest advert

Frontman Matt Healy perhaps isn’t aware that the Electoral Commission is not, in fact, the government (or believes that this is part of a wider conspiracy).

How do you make registering to vote in the EU Referendum cool? It sounds like something  from The Thick of It, but judging by the Electoral Commission’s latest TV ad for their new voting guide, this was a genuine question posed in their meetings this month. The finished product seems inspired by teen Tumblrs with its killer combination of secluded woodlands, vintage laundrettes and bright pink neon lighting.

But indie-pop band The 1975 saw a different inspiration for the advert: the campaign for their latest album, I Like It When You Sleep For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware Of It (Yes, a title perhaps even more cumbersome than “The EU Referendum - You Can’t Miss It (Phase One)”).

Lead singer Matt Healy posted a picture of the guide with the caption “LOOK OUT KIDZ THE GOVERNMENT ARE STEALING OUR THOUGHTS!!” back on 17 May. The release of the TV spot only furthered Healy’s suspicions:

Healy perhaps isn’t aware that the Electoral Commission is not, in fact, the government (or believes that this is part of a wider conspiracy).

The 1975’s manager, Jamie Oborne, was similarly outraged.

Oborne added that he was particularly “disappointed” that the director for the band’s video for their song “Settle Down”, Nadia Marquard Otzen, also directed the Electoral Commission’s ad. But Otzen also directed the Electoral Commission’s visually similar Scottish Referendum campaign video, released back in September 2014: almost a year before The 1975 released the first promotional image for their album on Instagram on 2 June 2015.

Many were quick to point out that the band “didn’t invent neon lights”. The band know this. Their visual identity draws on an array of artists working with neon: Dan Flavin’s florescent lights, James Turrell’s “Raemar pink white”, Nathan Coley’s esoteric, and oddly-placed, Turner-shortlisted work, Bruce Nauman’s aphoristic signs, Chris Bracey’s neon pink colour palette, to just name a few – never mind the thousands of Tumblrs that undoubtedly inspired Healy’s aesthetics (their neon signs were exhibited at a show called Tumblr IRL). I see no reason why Otzen might not be similarly influenced by this artistic tradition.

Of course, The 1975 may be right: they have helped to popularise this particular vibe, moving it out of aesthetic corners of the internet and onto leaflets dropped through every letterbox in the country. But if mainstream organisations weren’t making vaguely cringeworthy attempts to jump on board a particular moment, how would we know it was cool at all?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.