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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Economics should dictate the RBS sale (Financial Times)

Selling shares to Sid might make good politics, writes Alistair Darling, but the government must rise above that and put the interests of the country first.

2. We don’t share Europe’s vision. So I want out (Times)

Cameron’s promise of renegotiation is just an insincere ploy, writes Michael Portillo. Let’s hope the voters have more guts than their leaders.

3. I'm no Fergie fan. But he's proof that if you want to be the best, you have to breathe fire (Daily Mail)

Those attributes which led to Alex Ferguson’s football greatness are also the secret to achievement in the other combative trades and professions, writes Roy Hattersley. 

4. Nigel Farage gives good telly, so UKIP trumps the Greens (Guardian)

It has almost as many councillors as UKIP and more MPs, so why does the media so consistently ignore the Green Party, asks Zoe Williams.

5. This Queen’s Speech proves that the coalition is still going strong (Daily Telegraph)

The footsoldiers may be squabbling, but those at the top are determined to see the job through, says Peter Oborne.

6. Tories are hurting from a rush into coalition (Times)

Cameron should have formed a minority administration in 2010 and fought a second election that autumn, argues Steve Richards.

7. The sun is at last setting on Britain's imperial myth (Guardian)

The atrocities in Kenya are the tip of a history of violence that reveals the repackaging of empire for the fantasy it is, says Pankaj Mishra.

8. If you believe investors, we’re on the mend (Independent)

These price movements represent the considered opinion of thousands of professionals, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

9. We’re going to help criminals to go straight (Daily Telegraph)

Britain’s reoffending rates are shameful – it’s time to break this pernicious cycle, says Chris Grayling.

10. Microsoft has just blown its oldest trick (Financial Times)

A computer that people cannot switch off or find their way around is not useful, writes John Gapper.