Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Economics should dictate the RBS sale (Financial Times)

Selling shares to Sid might make good politics, writes Alistair Darling, but the government must rise above that and put the interests of the country first.

2. We don’t share Europe’s vision. So I want out (Times)

Cameron’s promise of renegotiation is just an insincere ploy, writes Michael Portillo. Let’s hope the voters have more guts than their leaders.

3. I'm no Fergie fan. But he's proof that if you want to be the best, you have to breathe fire (Daily Mail)

Those attributes which led to Alex Ferguson’s football greatness are also the secret to achievement in the other combative trades and professions, writes Roy Hattersley. 

4. Nigel Farage gives good telly, so UKIP trumps the Greens (Guardian)

It has almost as many councillors as UKIP and more MPs, so why does the media so consistently ignore the Green Party, asks Zoe Williams.

5. This Queen’s Speech proves that the coalition is still going strong (Daily Telegraph)

The footsoldiers may be squabbling, but those at the top are determined to see the job through, says Peter Oborne.

6. Tories are hurting from a rush into coalition (Times)

Cameron should have formed a minority administration in 2010 and fought a second election that autumn, argues Steve Richards.

7. The sun is at last setting on Britain's imperial myth (Guardian)

The atrocities in Kenya are the tip of a history of violence that reveals the repackaging of empire for the fantasy it is, says Pankaj Mishra.

8. If you believe investors, we’re on the mend (Independent)

These price movements represent the considered opinion of thousands of professionals, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

9. We’re going to help criminals to go straight (Daily Telegraph)

Britain’s reoffending rates are shameful – it’s time to break this pernicious cycle, says Chris Grayling.

10. Microsoft has just blown its oldest trick (Financial Times)

A computer that people cannot switch off or find their way around is not useful, writes John Gapper.

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Casting the Brexit movie that is definitely real and will totally happen

Details are yet unclear as to whether The Bad Boys of Brexit will be gracing our screens, or just Farage's vivid imagination.

Hollywood is planning to take on the farcical antics of Nigel Farage et al during the UK referendum, according to rumours (some suspect planted by a starstruck Brexiteer). 

Details are yet unclear as to whether The Bad Boys of Brexit will be gracing our big or small screens, a DVD, or just Farage's vivid imagination, but either way here are our picks for casting the Hollywood adaptation.

Nigel Farage: Jim Carrey

The 2018 return of Alan Partridge as "the voice of hard Brexit" makes Steve Coogan the obvious choice. Yet Carrey's portrayal of the laughable yet pure evil Count Olaf in A Series of Unfortunate Events makes him a serious contender for this role. 

Boris Johnson: Gerard Depardieu

Stick a blonde wig on him and the French acting royalty is almost the spitting image of our own European aristocrat. He has also evidently already mastered the look of pure shock necessary for the final scene of the movie - in which the Leave campaign is victorious.

Arron Banks: Ricky Gervais

Ricky Gervais not only resembles Ukip donor Arron Banks, but has a signature shifty face perfect for the scene where the other Brexiteers ask him what is the actual plan. 

Gerry Gunster: Anthony Lapaglia

The Bad Boys of Brexit will reportedly be told from the perspective of the US strategist turned Brexit referendum expert Gerry Gunster. Thanks to recurring roles in both the comedy stalwart Frasier, and the US crime drama Without a Trace, Anthony Lapaglia is versatile enough to do funny as well as serious, a perfect mix for a story that lurches from tragedy to farce. Also, they have the same cunning eyes.

Douglas Carswell: Mark Gatiss

The resemblance is uncanny.

David Cameron: Andrew Scott

Andrew Scott is widely known for his portrayal of Moriarty in Sherlock, where he indulges in elaborate, but nationally destructive strategy games. The actor also excels in a look of misplaced confidence that David Cameron wore all the way up to the referendum. Not to mention, his forehead is just as shiny. He'll have to drink a lot of Bollinger to gain that Cameron-esque puppy fat though. 

Kate Hoey: Judi Dench

Although this casting would ruin the image of the much beloved national treasure that is Judi Dench, if anyone can pull off being the face of Labour Leave, the incredible actress can.