Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Watch out, George Osborne: Smith, Marx and even the IMF are after you (Guardian)

When even the IMF's free market ideologues recoil from the UK chancellor's austerity politics, democracy itself is at stake, warns Ha-Joon Chang. 

2. For all his proficiency on the pallet, Ed still can’t speak human (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour leader’s populist approach isn’t working – precision and honesty are required, says Mary Riddell. 

3. The German model is not for export (Financial Times)

Forcing the eurozone to mimic Germany’s path to adjustment makes stagnation likely, writes Martin Wolf.

4. Cameron needs a big-tent conservatism (Times

Defectors to Nigel Farage came mostly from older voters, notes Daniel Finkelstein. Cameron needs to attract the young and the aspiring.

5. The idea that we can renegotiate with the EU is pure fantasy (Daily Mail)

The PM may not like it, but Nigel Lawson's absolutely right, says Daniel Hannan. 

6. Three ideas to fix the North-South divide in Britain (Independent)

Forty years ago London was struggling - but it's hard to identify the reasons for its turnaround, writes Hamish McRae. 

7. Lawson calls time on the three-pint heroes (Daily Telegraph)

The former Tory chancellor is right about leaving the EU, and closet sceptics will have to accept it, argues Nigel Farage.

8. The west and its allies cynically bleed Syria to weaken Iran (Guardian)

If western politicians were really interested in saving lives, they would use their leverage to negotiate a settlement, says Seumas Milne.

9. The EU has pushed Britain ‘out’ already (Times

No other European country shares our concern at the lack of democracy in the EU, writes Gisela Stuart.

10. If David Cameron had any sense, he would call a referendum on Europe now (Guardian)

With UKIP and now Nigel Lawson roaming free, he'll only regain the initiative on Europe if he calls Nick Clegg's bluff, writes Simon Jenkins.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.