Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A race between growth and populism (Financial Times)

The threat to the euro now comes from populists seeking to overturn the liberal order, writes Philip Stephens.

2. Ed Miliband is a blancmange in a hurricane (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s leader is weak, indecisive, lacks clarity, and has turned his party into a vacuum, says Michael Gove.

3. The murder of April Jones tested the strength of my community (Guardian)

For everyone connected, the experience has been shattering, but with Mark Bridger's conviction, the process of healing can begin, writes George Monbiot.

4. Cameron believes in marriage - so why doesn't he support it? (Daily Telegraph)

The PM has fought a bitter battle over gay marriage, but not on behalf of those who most need it, says Fraser Nelson.

5. Of borders and benefits: social security for EU nationals (Guardian)

The spirit of the EU is supposed to mitigate against individual states passing laws to treat other EU nationals less generously, says a Guardian editorial. 

6. The US war on terror is not yet over (Financial Times)

In some countries drones are the only face of American foreign policy, writes Ahmed Rashid.

7. Russia holds the key to ending Assad’s brutal and bloody reign in Syria (Independent)

Moscow is dropping heavy hints that - without US engagement - the status quo will prevail, writes Peter Popham.

8. George Osborne's botch job has left housing in crisis (Daily Telegraph)

The Help to Buy scheme is pointless without a coherent approach to planning, writes Isabel Hardman.

9. Russia holds the key to ending Assad’s brutal and bloody reign in Syria (Independent)

Moscow is dropping heavy hints that - without US engagement - the status quo will prevail, writes Peter Popham.

10. The Lib Dems should try being real liberals (Times)

To reverse his spectacular decline, Nick Clegg must move away from the centre ground, argues Mark Littlewood.

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.