Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Osborne should not be complacent (Financial Times)

The decision to tighten fiscal policy was a spectacular own goal even if the IMF does not dare to say so, writes Martin Wolf.

2. The Muslim faith does not turn men to terror (Daily Telegraph)

The two suspects in the Woolwich killing were violating the doctrine of their own holy book, says Mehdi Hasan.

3. Tories should not be prisoners of tradition (Times)

Tom Paine is hardly an icon of conservatism, but he has important lessons about marriage for David Cameron, writes Philip Collins.

4. Woolwich was a case study in the banality - and the idiocy - of evil (Daily Telegraph)

We shouldn’t bother looking for any logic in attacks like these, writes Fraser Nelson. There is none to be found.

5. This echo chamber of mass hysteria only aids terrorists (Guardian)

Perpetrators of violent acts of terror thrive on publicity – so politicians and the media need to stop giving it to them, writes Simon Jenkins.

6. For the best results, keep executive pay down (Times)

The bosses of the NHS and G4S earned so much that they had no fear of failure, says Ross Clark.

7. Why the right could doom welfare reform (Daily Telegraph)

Disability testing isn’t working as it should – and Conservatives must have the courage to admit it, says Isabel Hardman. 

8. George Osborne puts his pride before the national interest (Guardian)

An economically literate chancellor would rise to the challenge set down by the IMF, writes Ed Balls.

9. The long recession has one silver lining; EU leaders are finally tackling 'tax shopping' head on (Independent)

Cyprus was widely criticised for offering a haven for the money of Russian oligarchs, but the rest of Europe is littered with similarly cosy nooks, writes Peter Popham.

10. Jeremy Hunt's blundering blaming of GPs makes for bad politics (Guardian)

The health secretary is taking a risk in gunning for family doctors, says Polly Toynbee. The public trust them more than they do those in government.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.