Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Our British democracy is a presidential system - minus the President (Independent)

Cameron is only the latest Prime Minister to be in intense trouble, but this new pressure on a single individual makes being presidential almost impossible, writes Steve Richards.

2. Noise and truths in the IMF’s verdict (Financial Times)

Forget about fiscal policy – the urgent task is fixing the banks, says an FT editorial.

3. Why do these Tories think they can rule on marriage? (Guardian)

The antis in this week's vote think our sex lives are their business – yet Boris Johnson seems to escape without censure, writes Zoe Williams.

4. We’re in the age of coalitions. Get used to it (Times)

David Cameron understands that two-party politics is over, writes David Aaronovitch. If his party hates this, then it’s not fit to govern.

5. Interpol: fighting for truth and justice, or helping the villains? (Daily Telegraph)

This famous police force is being used by vicious despots to pursue their political enemies, says Peter Oborne.

6. Hard to build an ‘anyone but China’ club (Financial Times)

The unstated aim of the Trans-Pacific Partnership is a deal to bar the second-largest economy, says David Pilling. 

7. We should turn Britain into a tax haven (Times)

Rather than bash wealth-generating companies we should attract them by cutting and simplifying tax, argues Mark Littlewood.

8. I am the beneficiary of the house-price boom. My children are its victims (Guardian)

When the haves get worried not only about their futures but also those of their kids, the have-nots are really doomed, says Suzanne Moore.

9. Boris's sexual shenanigans and a landmark victory over our creeping culture of Stalinist secrecy (Daily Mail)

This ruling is a huge boost to an open society, writes Stephen Glover. 

10. The laws of the land aren’t fit for purpose (Daily Telegraph)

Efforts to clarify our complex, intimidating system of legislation are long overdue, writes Sue Cameron.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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