Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Our British democracy is a presidential system - minus the President (Independent)

Cameron is only the latest Prime Minister to be in intense trouble, but this new pressure on a single individual makes being presidential almost impossible, writes Steve Richards.

2. Noise and truths in the IMF’s verdict (Financial Times)

Forget about fiscal policy – the urgent task is fixing the banks, says an FT editorial.

3. Why do these Tories think they can rule on marriage? (Guardian)

The antis in this week's vote think our sex lives are their business – yet Boris Johnson seems to escape without censure, writes Zoe Williams.

4. We’re in the age of coalitions. Get used to it (Times)

David Cameron understands that two-party politics is over, writes David Aaronovitch. If his party hates this, then it’s not fit to govern.

5. Interpol: fighting for truth and justice, or helping the villains? (Daily Telegraph)

This famous police force is being used by vicious despots to pursue their political enemies, says Peter Oborne.

6. Hard to build an ‘anyone but China’ club (Financial Times)

The unstated aim of the Trans-Pacific Partnership is a deal to bar the second-largest economy, says David Pilling. 

7. We should turn Britain into a tax haven (Times)

Rather than bash wealth-generating companies we should attract them by cutting and simplifying tax, argues Mark Littlewood.

8. I am the beneficiary of the house-price boom. My children are its victims (Guardian)

When the haves get worried not only about their futures but also those of their kids, the have-nots are really doomed, says Suzanne Moore.

9. Boris's sexual shenanigans and a landmark victory over our creeping culture of Stalinist secrecy (Daily Mail)

This ruling is a huge boost to an open society, writes Stephen Glover. 

10. The laws of the land aren’t fit for purpose (Daily Telegraph)

Efforts to clarify our complex, intimidating system of legislation are long overdue, writes Sue Cameron.

A second referendum? Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Will there be a second EU referendum? Petition passes 1.75 million signatures

Updated: An official petition for a second EU referendum has passed 1.75m signatures - but does it have any chance of happening?

A petition calling for another EU referendum has passed 1.75 million signatures

"We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum," the petition reads. Overall, the turnout in the EU referendum on 23 June was 73 per cent, and 51.8 per cent of voters went for Leave.

The petition has been so popular it briefly crashed the government website, and is now the biggest petition in the site's history.

After 10,000 signatures, the government has to respond to an official petition. After 100,000 signatures, it must be considered for a debate in parliament. 

Nigel Farage has previously said he would have asked for a second referendum based on a 52-48 result in favour of Remain.

However, what the petition is asking for would be, in effect, for Britain to stay as a member of the EU. Turnout of 75 per cent is far higher than recent general elections, and a margin of victory of 20 points is also ambitious. In the 2014 independence referendum in Scotland, the split was 55-45 in favour of remaining in the union. 

Unfortunately for those dismayed by the referendum result, even if the petition is debated in parliament, there will be no vote and it will have no legal weight. 

Another petition has been set up for London to declare independence, which has attracted 130,000 signatures.