Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Tory party is in agony, but Labour is also leeching support (Daily Telegraph)

If he is to win back public trust, Labour leader Ed Miliband must tell voters what his spending plans entail, says Mary Riddell.

2. The climate sceptics have already won (Financial Times)

The real and present dangers are too uncomfortable to confront, writes Martin Wolf.

3. First, David Cameron should bring his own tax havens to book (Guardian)

Pressing the G8 to get tough on avoidance is hypocrisy while British dependencies like the Caymans still thrive, writes Simon Jenkins.

4. Why I’m ducking out of the Scottish debate (Times

Instinctively I’m sceptical of separation but politically there’s an advantage in Labour-voting Scotland leaving, writes Daniel Finkelstein.

5. George Osborne may not be dead in the water after all. What will Labour do then? (Guardian)

The IMF may today deliver good(ish) news on the economy, writes Gaby Hinsliff. Even a fake recovery would be bad news for the two Eds.

6. Stocks are booming, so beware the bust (Daily Telegraph)

The return of 'animal spirits’ usually points to better times, but it’s more complicated now, writes Jeremy Warner.

7. The ugly truth is a smug Tory elite has sneered at the party faithful for decades (Daily Mail)

Cameron is surrounded by people who sneer at the morals and values of his party's grassroots supporters, writes Simon Heffer.

8. Ed Miliband is staring at an open goal and I know just the pair of strikers to win it for him (Independent)

Darling and Mandy cut unlikely superheroes, writes Matthew Norman. But it's time for Miliband to bring them back. 

9. Cameron is no longer a winner (Financial Times)

Activists who picked the PM in 2005 to end a losing streak now regret their choice, writes Tim Bale.

10. Job security is a thing of the past - so millions need a better welfare system (Guardian)

Flexible labour markets have created a growing 'precariat', who should have the right to a basic standard of living, says Guy Standing.

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Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.