Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron shouldn’t blame our rowdy press for his own failings (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister suffers because he is not very good at politics, says Benedict Brogan.

2. Why I shifted sides over Europe (Financial Times)

I have not changed my view but now appear to be on the other side of the battle lines, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. The Great Gatsby's world is every bit as unequal as Britain under the coalition (Guardian)

The wealthy in America and Britain no longer resemble the prewar elite, but appearances cannot mask how cut off they are from the rest of us, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

4. Those aren’t loons, they’re just the over-60s (Times)

As membership dwindles, activists have less and less in common with voters, writes Rachel Sylvester. The party system needs a total rethink.

5. It feels like the right has split irrevocably (Daily Telegraph)

David Cameron's carelessness has mixed with public contempt for politicians to create a toxic brew, says Iain Martin.

6. Mervyn King's housing warning is too little, too late (Guardian)

In a British economy addicted to property inflation, the government's Help to Buy scheme threatens Fannie Mae-style disaster, writes Polly Toynbee. 

7. Tories misunderstand the last election (Financial Times)

Cameron’s estrangement from his party began with the failure of 2010, writes Janan Ganesh.

8. This is Syria's great chance for change (Guardian)

It is crucial that all sides approach June's international conference with hope as well as caution, says Jonathan Steele.

9. Who's in charge of the clattering Tory Party? (Daily Mail)

Cameron should be broadening his entourage to include hard-headed Tories with experience of the real world and the gut instincts of the British people, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. Obama has a tricky balance to strike (Independent)

President Obama's economic record is good, but the successes of his second term risk being overshadowed by Washington's three separate "scandals", says an Independent editorial.

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Theresa May takes early lead in the Conservative leadership race

The first poll of the Tory contest puts the Home Secretary well out in front

Theresa May, the Home Secretary is well ahead among Conservative members according to a new YouGov poll for the Times

She is both the preferred first choice of a plurality of members from an open field (she secures 37 per cent of the vote, with her nearest rival, Boris Johnson, 10 points behind) and roundly trounces Johnson with 55 per cent to 38 per cent. In all other head-to-heads, Johnson wins comfortably.

Although YouGov have a patchy recent record in national contests - they predicted the London mayoral victory but failed to foresee the Conservative majority or the Brexit vote - they are four for four as far as internal party contests are concerned, having accurately predicted both the result and the final vote share of the 2015 and 2010 Labour leadership contests and the 2005 and 2001 Conservative contests. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.