Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron had the chance to defy the 'swivel-eyed loons' and remake his party. He failed (Guardian)

This week Cameron's been exposed, writes Steve Richards. There was little thinking on what modern Conservatism might be like. Now he can only busk it.

2. Kerry displays his vaulting ambitions (Financial Times)

Since February, there has been a new sense of purpose to US diplomacy, writes Edward Luce.

3. Here’s the speech Cameron should give now (Times)

If the Tory leader is self-effacing and makes peace with his restless party he can still defeat Labour in 2015, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. The moral case on tax avoidance is overwhelming - and we all know Google wants to do the right thing (Independent)

There is nothing law-breaking about tax avoidance and this is of course the point, writes Owen Jones. The law is rigged in favour of the wealthy and the state is at the service of the rich.

5. Britain needs a broader debate over cuts (Financial Times)

We need a serious debate about whether to protect health, pensions and schools while other areas are cut by 30 per cent, says Paul Johnson.

6. Swivel-eyed, or seeing clearly? (Daily Telegraph)

The latest row between the Conservative leadership and the base shows that the Tories can no longer rely on unquestioning loyalty, says Tim Bale.

7. Apologise for expecting the best? No chance (Times)

The defeatism I heard from some head teachers only encourages me to press on with reform, says Michael Gove.

8. Housing market: the rule of bad ideas (Guardian)

Britain urgently needs more public housing and this is the ideal time to underwrite local-council building of new homes, says a Guardian editorial.

9. PM must swivel view on Europe (Sun)

David Cameron must rapidly choose which side to be on, writes Trevor Kavanagh. Right now, he looks like a man swept along by forces beyond his control.

10. The Republican wolves are out for Obama but they are yet to draw blood (Guardian)

Beset by scandal at home and abroad, Obama's only luck has been in his opponents' tin ear for the public mood, says Gary Younge.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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