Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This is a farcical new low and David Cameron is losing control (Observer)

Geoffrey Howe accuses the Prime Minister of presiding over a nervous breakdown in his party.

2. Tory self-harm over Europe has buried the good news (Sunday Telegraph)

Matthew D'Ancona would like to see green shoots of economic recovery but there's a Eurosceptic carnival obscuring his view.

3. The Tories held it together in the past. This time it's different. (Observer)

A formal split in the party is no longer unthinkable, says Andrew Rawnsley.

4. The Conservatives are mired in arguments with themselves (Sunday Telegraph)

Taking a cavalier approach to party management may be David Cameron's biggest mistake, says Iain Martin.

5. Stop the panic and plots, PM, or kiss No10 goodbye (Sunday Times)

Adam Boulton smells decay at the heart of the government.

6. Farage showed his true colours (Scotland on Sunday)

Euan McColm thinks the Ukip leader's chaotic trip to Edinburgh will not deter his ambitions to find voters in Scotland.

7. Offer voters the EU pizza and they spit it out (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul looks a little closer at the opinion polls and finds them not as bad for David Cameron as at first they seem.

8. At Google, we aspire to do the right thing (Observer)

Chairman Eric Schmidt on the defensive about his company's alleged tax avoidance.

9. Why Tories won't play follow my leader (Sunday Times)

Leader column starts to despair of David Cameron without mustering much enthusiasm for anyone else.

10. The media talks in stereotypes but misses the big picture (Independent on Sunday)

Paul Vallely thinks Muslim community activists deserve more credit for challenging distorted notions of masculinity.

 

 

Getty
Show Hide image

Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

0800 7318496