Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This is a farcical new low and David Cameron is losing control (Observer)

Geoffrey Howe accuses the Prime Minister of presiding over a nervous breakdown in his party.

2. Tory self-harm over Europe has buried the good news (Sunday Telegraph)

Matthew D'Ancona would like to see green shoots of economic recovery but there's a Eurosceptic carnival obscuring his view.

3. The Tories held it together in the past. This time it's different. (Observer)

A formal split in the party is no longer unthinkable, says Andrew Rawnsley.

4. The Conservatives are mired in arguments with themselves (Sunday Telegraph)

Taking a cavalier approach to party management may be David Cameron's biggest mistake, says Iain Martin.

5. Stop the panic and plots, PM, or kiss No10 goodbye (Sunday Times)

Adam Boulton smells decay at the heart of the government.

6. Farage showed his true colours (Scotland on Sunday)

Euan McColm thinks the Ukip leader's chaotic trip to Edinburgh will not deter his ambitions to find voters in Scotland.

7. Offer voters the EU pizza and they spit it out (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul looks a little closer at the opinion polls and finds them not as bad for David Cameron as at first they seem.

8. At Google, we aspire to do the right thing (Observer)

Chairman Eric Schmidt on the defensive about his company's alleged tax avoidance.

9. Why Tories won't play follow my leader (Sunday Times)

Leader column starts to despair of David Cameron without mustering much enthusiasm for anyone else.

10. The media talks in stereotypes but misses the big picture (Independent on Sunday)

Paul Vallely thinks Muslim community activists deserve more credit for challenging distorted notions of masculinity.

 

 

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Space Oddity? Dr David Bowie is treating former astronaut Buzz Aldrin

Ground control to major coincidence.

The 86-year-old former astronaut and second man on the moon Buzz Aldrin has been evacuated from the South Pole to hospital in New Zealand. Your mole thought this was yet another piece of dismal 2016 news, before the silver lining popped up on Twitter. Aldrin’s manager Christina Korp sent a thrilling message about her client’s treatment:

Yes, the real-life “Starman” is going to be treated by a doctor who shares his name with the late pop icon who wrote “Space Oddity”, “Life on Mars?”, “Ziggy Stardust” and “Starman”, among many other odes to space.

In fact, Bowie’s “Space Oddity” hit about ground control losing contact with the fictional astronaut Major Tom was released in 1969, a few days before Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to walk on the moon. This mole’s whiskers are quivering at the poignancy.

I'm a mole, innit.