Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This is a farcical new low and David Cameron is losing control (Observer)

Geoffrey Howe accuses the Prime Minister of presiding over a nervous breakdown in his party.

2. Tory self-harm over Europe has buried the good news (Sunday Telegraph)

Matthew D'Ancona would like to see green shoots of economic recovery but there's a Eurosceptic carnival obscuring his view.

3. The Tories held it together in the past. This time it's different. (Observer)

A formal split in the party is no longer unthinkable, says Andrew Rawnsley.

4. The Conservatives are mired in arguments with themselves (Sunday Telegraph)

Taking a cavalier approach to party management may be David Cameron's biggest mistake, says Iain Martin.

5. Stop the panic and plots, PM, or kiss No10 goodbye (Sunday Times)

Adam Boulton smells decay at the heart of the government.

6. Farage showed his true colours (Scotland on Sunday)

Euan McColm thinks the Ukip leader's chaotic trip to Edinburgh will not deter his ambitions to find voters in Scotland.

7. Offer voters the EU pizza and they spit it out (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul looks a little closer at the opinion polls and finds them not as bad for David Cameron as at first they seem.

8. At Google, we aspire to do the right thing (Observer)

Chairman Eric Schmidt on the defensive about his company's alleged tax avoidance.

9. Why Tories won't play follow my leader (Sunday Times)

Leader column starts to despair of David Cameron without mustering much enthusiasm for anyone else.

10. The media talks in stereotypes but misses the big picture (Independent on Sunday)

Paul Vallely thinks Muslim community activists deserve more credit for challenging distorted notions of masculinity.



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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.