Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. If Dave cuts a deal with Ukip I'm outta here (Times)

Matthew Parris loses patience with Cameron's flakiness in the face of Farage.

2. David Cameron isn't a disaster, yet I long for a radical new leader (Telegraph)

Charles Moore doubts the Prime Minister is up to the great challenges of the era.

3. Don't be fooled by Google's Prius-driving baby-facery (Guardian)

Young tech entrepreneurs promised a different kind of business, says Marine Hyde. Their tax affairs tell a different story.

4. The generation that's going backwards (Times)

Gavin Kelly on a suffocating squeeze for workers and a joyless recovery in the economy.

5. The Battle for Britain (Guardian)

John Harris goes on safari in Ukip country.

6. Britain's looming energy crisis (FT)

Leader columns warns that the government's bill won't necessarily keep the lights on.

7. To encourage creativity, Mr Gove, you must first understand what it is (Guardian)

The new national curriculum, warns Ken Robinson, is a dead hand on the creative pulse of children and teachers.

8. A serious contender? The grey man who could be Cameron's nemesis (Daily Mail)

Simon Heffer gets excited about Philip Hammond.

9. The next coalition? Why Ed Miliband may need Nick Clegg's number (Independent)

Peter Hain tells Andy Grice that a Lib-Lab pact in another hung parliament is on the cards.

10. Dangerous talk of arrogant Frogs and the heartless Boche (FT)

Tony Barber scratches beneath the surface fo Europe's appetite for national stereotypes.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.