Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from the papers.

1. The giants of the green world that profit from the planet's destruction (Guardian)

A new movement has erupted demanding divestment from fossil fuel polluters – and Big Green is in their sights, writes Naomi Klein.

2. Panic is pointless. UKIP’s not a serious party (Times)

Nigel Farage is benefiting from a move away from two-party domination, but protest parties always fizzle out, says Philip Collins.

3. Wanted: a leader who can unite the warring Tory tribes (Daily Telegraph)

The modernisers and the right of the Conservative Party need one another to create a winning coalition, says Iain Martin.

4. We know spending on the arts makes big money for Britain. So why cut it? (Guardian)

Whingeing luvvies are easily mocked but it just doesn't make sense to give way to this purblind, anti-cultural bias, says Polly Toynbee.

5. Will Osborne choose politics or prudence? (Times)

If the Chancellor rushes to give away bank shares, he will reveal his true priorities, writes Sam Coates.

6. Will Carney be a man of independent mind? (Daily Telegraph)

Chancellor George Osborne has made himself clear, and the new Bank of England governor may face an early test, writes Jeremy Warner.

7. No such thing as ‘historic’ rape (Independent)

There no reason – legal or moral – for such crimes to "expire", particularly given the trauma that often results, says an Independent editorial.

8. Threats to Asia’s fragile power balance (Financial Times)

The world’s most vibrant region is also potentially its most combustible, writes Philip Stephens.

9. Charging headlong towards a secret state (Daily Mail)

Secret arrests are an assault on Britain's hard-won freedoms, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. Holland is proof that the less power a monarch has the more we seem to love them (Independent)

When nations fall into crisis, their populations cry out for the saviour figure, writes Peter Popham.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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