Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. When prisoners mean profit, the numbers don't go down (Guardian)

Cracking down on Sky TV for inmates is easy, writes Zoe Williams. Solving the paradox of a privatised prison service is going to be a lot harder.

2. Voters should learn the lesson of history and back a Tory (Daily Telegraph)

Stealing votes from the Tories guarantees the election of a pro-European Labour Party in thrall to the unions, says Peter Oborne.

3. Bangladesh's tragedies must stop (Financial Times)

Western companies should not withdraw from the country but work to raise standards, writes John Gapper.

4. MMR is the Hillsborough of my profession (Times)

In a crime worse than phone hacking, journalists of all stripes put sensationalism before science and misled the public, writes David Aaronovitch.

5. Whatever you think of fracking, this isn't the way forward (Guardian)

An energy policy based on buying off hostility to fracking by building badminton courts won't keep our lights on, says Michael Hanlon.

6. Which side is Cameron's new team on? (Daily Telegraph)

His backbench advisers may find their loyalties divided between No 10 and the Commons, writes Sue Cameron.

7. Austerity is not the only answer to debt (Financial Times)

Keynes was not dismissive of debt, write Kenneth Rogoff and Carmen Reinhart. Why should we be?

8. Dave won't back down on aid. But wily ministers are finding ways to get him out of the mire (Daily Mail)

Sinuous ministers such as Philip Hammond are searching for legitimate ways to raid the aid budget, writes Stephen Glover.

9. Like the unions before it, the press has shown us who really governs Britain (Guardian)

Cameron has failed a generation by allowing Leveson to go under, says Martin Kettle. Media barons have bent parliament to their will.

10. This pensioner isn’t giving his benefits back (Independent)

I cannot send off cheques to the very people, ministers and civil servants alike, who are so bad at their jobs that we have had to invent a word to describe their failings, says Andreas Whittam Smith.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
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Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

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