The New Statesman is looking for a Culture Editor

Applications are open.

 

The NS is looking for a new culture editor to start at the end of May. The successful candidate for this job will need:

  • Excellent knowledge of culture, literature and the arts to commission the best writers and identify the most interesting upcoming releases     
  • The organisational ability to plan well ahead
  • Superb, careful close editing skills to ensure fine writing is encouraged and refined
  • The ability to work collaboratively with our small, dedicated team
  • Plenty of ideas for coverage across both the books and main features pages of the magazine and online.

Our ideal culture editor is a brilliant generalist, somebody who is as at home writing a leader on politics as they are interviewing Charlotte Church. The New Statesman has always been proud of the depth and range of its books and arts pages and we are looking for somebody with energy and imagination and who loves high and popular culture and can cover both in an intelligent way.

Because the New Statesman team is small, you will be expected to contribute ideas across the magazine and help us develop our special editions. There will also be the opportunity to host cultural events and contribute to our podcast and website.

The personality of the culture editor defines the culture pages of the magazine, so please include with your CV and covering letter a short appraisal (up to 500 words) of the NS’s culture and books coverage and what you would do differently. And tell us which writers you would introduce to the NS.

Applications by noon on Friday 10 May to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis (Helen@newstatesman.co.uk) with the subject line “NS Culture Editor”. 

 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Getty
Show Hide image

Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496