The New Statesman is looking for a Culture Editor

Applications are open.

 

The NS is looking for a new culture editor to start at the end of May. The successful candidate for this job will need:

  • Excellent knowledge of culture, literature and the arts to commission the best writers and identify the most interesting upcoming releases     
  • The organisational ability to plan well ahead
  • Superb, careful close editing skills to ensure fine writing is encouraged and refined
  • The ability to work collaboratively with our small, dedicated team
  • Plenty of ideas for coverage across both the books and main features pages of the magazine and online.

Our ideal culture editor is a brilliant generalist, somebody who is as at home writing a leader on politics as they are interviewing Charlotte Church. The New Statesman has always been proud of the depth and range of its books and arts pages and we are looking for somebody with energy and imagination and who loves high and popular culture and can cover both in an intelligent way.

Because the New Statesman team is small, you will be expected to contribute ideas across the magazine and help us develop our special editions. There will also be the opportunity to host cultural events and contribute to our podcast and website.

The personality of the culture editor defines the culture pages of the magazine, so please include with your CV and covering letter a short appraisal (up to 500 words) of the NS’s culture and books coverage and what you would do differently. And tell us which writers you would introduce to the NS.

Applications by noon on Friday 10 May to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis (Helen@newstatesman.co.uk) with the subject line “NS Culture Editor”. 

 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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LISTEN: Boris Johnson has a meltdown in car crash interview on the Queen’s Speech

“Hang on a second…errr…I’m sorry, I’m sorry.”

“Hang on a second,” Boris Johnson sighed. On air, you could hear the desperate rustling of his briefing notes (probably a crumpled Waitrose receipt with “crikey” written on it) and him burbling for an answer.

Over and over again, on issues of racism, working-class inequality, educational opportunity, mental healthcare and housing, the Foreign Secretary failed to answer questions about the content of his own government’s Queen’s Speech, and how it fails to tackle “burning injustices” (in Theresa May’s words).

With each new question, he floundered more – to the extent that BBC Radio 4 PM’s presenter Eddie Mair snapped: “It’s not a Two Ronnies sketch; you can’t answer the question before last.”

But why read your soon-to-be predecessor’s Queen’s Speech when you’re busy planning your own, eh?

Your mole isn’t particularly surprised at this poor performance. Throughout the election campaign, Tory politicians – particularly cabinet secretaries – gave interview after interview riddled with gaffes.

These performances were somewhat overlooked by a political world set on humiliating shadow home secretary Diane Abbott, who has been struggling with ill health. Perhaps if commentators had less of an anti-Abbott agenda – and noticed the car crash performances the Tories were repeatedly giving and getting away with it – the election result would have been less of a surprise.

I'm a mole, innit.

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