The New Statesman is looking for a Culture Editor

Applications are open.

 

The NS is looking for a new culture editor to start at the end of May. The successful candidate for this job will need:

  • Excellent knowledge of culture, literature and the arts to commission the best writers and identify the most interesting upcoming releases     
  • The organisational ability to plan well ahead
  • Superb, careful close editing skills to ensure fine writing is encouraged and refined
  • The ability to work collaboratively with our small, dedicated team
  • Plenty of ideas for coverage across both the books and main features pages of the magazine and online.

Our ideal culture editor is a brilliant generalist, somebody who is as at home writing a leader on politics as they are interviewing Charlotte Church. The New Statesman has always been proud of the depth and range of its books and arts pages and we are looking for somebody with energy and imagination and who loves high and popular culture and can cover both in an intelligent way.

Because the New Statesman team is small, you will be expected to contribute ideas across the magazine and help us develop our special editions. There will also be the opportunity to host cultural events and contribute to our podcast and website.

The personality of the culture editor defines the culture pages of the magazine, so please include with your CV and covering letter a short appraisal (up to 500 words) of the NS’s culture and books coverage and what you would do differently. And tell us which writers you would introduce to the NS.

Applications by noon on Friday 10 May to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis (Helen@newstatesman.co.uk) with the subject line “NS Culture Editor”. 

 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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