The New Statesman is looking for a Culture Editor

Applications are open.

 

The NS is looking for a new culture editor to start at the end of May. The successful candidate for this job will need:

  • Excellent knowledge of culture, literature and the arts to commission the best writers and identify the most interesting upcoming releases     
  • The organisational ability to plan well ahead
  • Superb, careful close editing skills to ensure fine writing is encouraged and refined
  • The ability to work collaboratively with our small, dedicated team
  • Plenty of ideas for coverage across both the books and main features pages of the magazine and online.

Our ideal culture editor is a brilliant generalist, somebody who is as at home writing a leader on politics as they are interviewing Charlotte Church. The New Statesman has always been proud of the depth and range of its books and arts pages and we are looking for somebody with energy and imagination and who loves high and popular culture and can cover both in an intelligent way.

Because the New Statesman team is small, you will be expected to contribute ideas across the magazine and help us develop our special editions. There will also be the opportunity to host cultural events and contribute to our podcast and website.

The personality of the culture editor defines the culture pages of the magazine, so please include with your CV and covering letter a short appraisal (up to 500 words) of the NS’s culture and books coverage and what you would do differently. And tell us which writers you would introduce to the NS.

Applications by noon on Friday 10 May to Deputy Editor Helen Lewis (Helen@newstatesman.co.uk) with the subject line “NS Culture Editor”. 

 

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.