Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This latest cure for the NHS really could kill the patient (Guardian)

They're calling it a health revolution, writes Polly Toynbee. So expect a boom in private profit, public mistrust and bankrupt hospitals.

2. Regime tests the limits of a MAD world (Financial Times)

If there is a state that might defy the logic of nuclear deterrence, it is North Korea, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. Ed’s ignoring the elephant in the spare room (Times)

Labour is opposing the horrid practicalities of the ‘bedroom tax’, writes Hugo Rifkind, but is silent on the principle: who owes what to whom?

4. Communism, welfare state – what's the next big idea? (Guardian)

Any attempt to challenge the elite needs courage, inspiration and a truly groundbreaking proposal, writes George Monbiot. Here are two to set us off.

5. Does religion still have a place in today’s politics? (Daily Telegraph)

The recent row between churches and the state over welfare policy shows how the power of the clergy is waning, says Paul Goodman.

6. Tories ignore signs in rush for the exit (Financial Times)

The party is forgetting the qualities that could ensure victory, says Janan Ganesh.

7. There’s something Churchillian about Boris Johnson. On the other hand... (Independent)

He’s a lone wolf, capable of staggering selfishness - it might actually be a valuable trait, says Dominic Lawson.

8. David Miliband and the debasement of British politics (Guardian)

Our MPs are increasingly remote from the voters – Westminster has become the equivalent of a gap year for middle-aged overachievers, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

What matters should not be who is providing a public service, but how well they are doing it, and at what price, argues a Telegraph leader.

10. The welfare state enters a new, and riskier, era (Independent)

The generally quiescent public mood could soon turn, says an Independent editorial.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.