Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This latest cure for the NHS really could kill the patient (Guardian)

They're calling it a health revolution, writes Polly Toynbee. So expect a boom in private profit, public mistrust and bankrupt hospitals.

2. Regime tests the limits of a MAD world (Financial Times)

If there is a state that might defy the logic of nuclear deterrence, it is North Korea, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. Ed’s ignoring the elephant in the spare room (Times)

Labour is opposing the horrid practicalities of the ‘bedroom tax’, writes Hugo Rifkind, but is silent on the principle: who owes what to whom?

4. Communism, welfare state – what's the next big idea? (Guardian)

Any attempt to challenge the elite needs courage, inspiration and a truly groundbreaking proposal, writes George Monbiot. Here are two to set us off.

5. Does religion still have a place in today’s politics? (Daily Telegraph)

The recent row between churches and the state over welfare policy shows how the power of the clergy is waning, says Paul Goodman.

6. Tories ignore signs in rush for the exit (Financial Times)

The party is forgetting the qualities that could ensure victory, says Janan Ganesh.

7. There’s something Churchillian about Boris Johnson. On the other hand... (Independent)

He’s a lone wolf, capable of staggering selfishness - it might actually be a valuable trait, says Dominic Lawson.

8. David Miliband and the debasement of British politics (Guardian)

Our MPs are increasingly remote from the voters – Westminster has become the equivalent of a gap year for middle-aged overachievers, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

What matters should not be who is providing a public service, but how well they are doing it, and at what price, argues a Telegraph leader.

10. The welfare state enters a new, and riskier, era (Independent)

The generally quiescent public mood could soon turn, says an Independent editorial.

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Supreme Court Article 50 winner demands white paper on Brexit

The Supreme Court ruled Parliament must be consulted before triggering Article 50. Grahame Pigney, of the People's Challenge, plans to build on the victory. 

A crowd-funded campaign that has forced the government to consult Parliament on Article 50 is now calling for a white paper on Brexit.

The People's Challenge worked alongside Gina Miller and other interested parties to force the government to back down over its plan to trigger Article 50 without prior parliamentary approval. 

On Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court ruled 8-3 that the government must first be authorised by an act of Parliament.

Grahame Pigney, the founder of the campaign, said: "It is absolutely great we have now got Parliament back in control, rather than decisions taken in some secret room in Whitehall.

"If this had been overturned it would have taken us back to 1687, before the Bill of Rights."

Pigney, whose campaign has raised more than £100,000, is now plannign a second campaign. He said: "The first step should be for a white paper to be brought before Parliament for debate." The demand has also been made by the Exiting the European Union select committee

The "Second People's Challenge" aims to pool legal knowledge with like-minded campaigners and protect MPs "against bullying and populist rhetoric". 

The white paper should state "what the Brexit objectives are, how (factually) they would benefit the UK, and what must happen if they are not achieved". 

The campaign will also aim to fund a Europe-facing charm offensive, with "a major effort" to ensure politicians in EU countries understand that public opinion is "not universally in favour of ‘Brexit at any price’".

Pigney, like Miller, has always maintained that he is motivated by the principle of parliamentary sovereignty, rather than a bid to stop Brexit per se.

In an interview with The Staggers, he said: "One of the things that has characterised this government is they want to keep everything secret.”

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.