Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This latest cure for the NHS really could kill the patient (Guardian)

They're calling it a health revolution, writes Polly Toynbee. So expect a boom in private profit, public mistrust and bankrupt hospitals.

2. Regime tests the limits of a MAD world (Financial Times)

If there is a state that might defy the logic of nuclear deterrence, it is North Korea, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. Ed’s ignoring the elephant in the spare room (Times)

Labour is opposing the horrid practicalities of the ‘bedroom tax’, writes Hugo Rifkind, but is silent on the principle: who owes what to whom?

4. Communism, welfare state – what's the next big idea? (Guardian)

Any attempt to challenge the elite needs courage, inspiration and a truly groundbreaking proposal, writes George Monbiot. Here are two to set us off.

5. Does religion still have a place in today’s politics? (Daily Telegraph)

The recent row between churches and the state over welfare policy shows how the power of the clergy is waning, says Paul Goodman.

6. Tories ignore signs in rush for the exit (Financial Times)

The party is forgetting the qualities that could ensure victory, says Janan Ganesh.

7. There’s something Churchillian about Boris Johnson. On the other hand... (Independent)

He’s a lone wolf, capable of staggering selfishness - it might actually be a valuable trait, says Dominic Lawson.

8. David Miliband and the debasement of British politics (Guardian)

Our MPs are increasingly remote from the voters – Westminster has become the equivalent of a gap year for middle-aged overachievers, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

What matters should not be who is providing a public service, but how well they are doing it, and at what price, argues a Telegraph leader.

10. The welfare state enters a new, and riskier, era (Independent)

The generally quiescent public mood could soon turn, says an Independent editorial.

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The Fire Brigades Union reaffiliates to Labour - what does it mean?

Any union rejoining Labour will be welcomed by most in the party - but the impact on the party's internal politics will be smaller than you think.

The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) has voted to reaffiliate to the Labour party, in what is seen as a boost to Jeremy Corbyn. What does it mean for Labour’s internal politics?

Firstly, technically, the FBU has never affliated before as they are notionally part of the civil service - however, following the firefighters' strike in 2004, they decisively broke with Labour.

The main impact will be felt on the floor of Labour party conference. Although the FBU’s membership – at around 38,000 – is too small to have a material effect on the outcome of votes themselves, it will change the tenor of the motions put before party conference.

The FBU’s leadership is not only to the left of most unions in the Trades Union Congress (TUC), it is more inclined to bring motions relating to foreign affairs than other unions with similar politics (it is more internationalist in focus than, say, the PCS, another union that may affiliate due to Corbyn’s leadership). Motions on Israel/Palestine, the nuclear deterrent, and other issues, will find more support from FBU delegates than it has from other affiliated trade unions.

In terms of the balance of power between the affiliated unions themselves, the FBU’s re-entry into Labour politics is unlikely to be much of a gamechanger. Trade union positions, elected by trade union delegates at conference, are unlikely to be moved leftwards by the reaffiliation of the FBU. Unite, the GMB, Unison and Usdaw are all large enough to all-but-guarantee themselves a seat around the NEC. Community, a small centrist union, has already lost its place on the NEC in favour of the bakers’ union, which is more aligned to Tom Watson than Jeremy Corbyn.

Matt Wrack, the FBU’s General Secretary, will be a genuine ally to Corbyn and John McDonnell. Len McCluskey and Dave Prentis were both bounced into endorsing Corbyn by their executives and did so less than wholeheartedly. Tim Roache, the newly-elected General Secretary of the GMB, has publicly supported Corbyn but is seen as a more moderate voice at the TUC. Only Dave Ward of the Communication Workers’ Union, who lent staff and resources to both Corbyn’s campaign team and to the parliamentary staff of Corbyn and McDonnell, is truly on side.

The impact of reaffiliation may be felt more keenly in local parties. The FBU’s membership looks small in real terms compared Unite and Unison have memberships of over a million, while the GMB and Usdaw are around the half-a-million mark, but is much more impressive when you consider that there are just 48,000 firefighters in Britain. This may make them more likely to participate in internal elections than other affiliated trade unionists, just 60,000 of whom voted in the Labour leadership election in 2015. However, it is worth noting that it is statistically unlikely most firefighters are Corbynites - those that are will mostly have already joined themselves. The affiliation, while a morale boost for many in the Labour party, is unlikely to prove as significant to the direction of the party as the outcome of Unison’s general secretary election or the struggle for power at the top of Unite in 2018. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.