Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. This latest cure for the NHS really could kill the patient (Guardian)

They're calling it a health revolution, writes Polly Toynbee. So expect a boom in private profit, public mistrust and bankrupt hospitals.

2. Regime tests the limits of a MAD world (Financial Times)

If there is a state that might defy the logic of nuclear deterrence, it is North Korea, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. Ed’s ignoring the elephant in the spare room (Times)

Labour is opposing the horrid practicalities of the ‘bedroom tax’, writes Hugo Rifkind, but is silent on the principle: who owes what to whom?

4. Communism, welfare state – what's the next big idea? (Guardian)

Any attempt to challenge the elite needs courage, inspiration and a truly groundbreaking proposal, writes George Monbiot. Here are two to set us off.

5. Does religion still have a place in today’s politics? (Daily Telegraph)

The recent row between churches and the state over welfare policy shows how the power of the clergy is waning, says Paul Goodman.

6. Tories ignore signs in rush for the exit (Financial Times)

The party is forgetting the qualities that could ensure victory, says Janan Ganesh.

7. There’s something Churchillian about Boris Johnson. On the other hand... (Independent)

He’s a lone wolf, capable of staggering selfishness - it might actually be a valuable trait, says Dominic Lawson.

8. David Miliband and the debasement of British politics (Guardian)

Our MPs are increasingly remote from the voters – Westminster has become the equivalent of a gap year for middle-aged overachievers, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

What matters should not be who is providing a public service, but how well they are doing it, and at what price, argues a Telegraph leader.

10. The welfare state enters a new, and riskier, era (Independent)

The generally quiescent public mood could soon turn, says an Independent editorial.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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