Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. Labour must draw the sting from welfare, or lose in 2015 (Guardian)

Ed Miliband has to defy the skiver talk instead of vainly propping up the status quo or doing the Tories' work for them, writes Jonathan Freedland

2.Law and disorder: the destructive dynamic of America's segregated cities (Guardian)

Policing tactics like stop-and-frisk treat symptom as cause: so we end up getting punitive racial profiling rather than tackling poverty, writes Gary Younge

3. Mick Philpott: if welfare's to blame, so is the army, prison, feminism, TV etc (Guardian)

Calls for benefit reform in the wake of Philpott's conviction for manslaughter are predictable but troubling. Can one man's sick psyche really be a political issue? asks Deborah Orr

4. Jay-Z, rapper with a sporting goal (Financial Times)

Behind the feints and boasts lies a great capitalist story, writes Ludovic Hunter-Tilney

5. History is leaving welfare state behind (Financial Times)

British parties that take comfort in tired attitudes will be dumped, writes Janan Ganesh

6. Google revolution isn’t worth our privacy (Financial Times)

This is a future we would be wise to avoid, writes Evgeny Morozov

7. A gloriously crude topless 'jihad' from a Femen activist (Guardian)

Femen deserve the support the Arab spring got. They're giving patriarchy – and mealy-mouthed relativists – a kick up the arse, writes Jonathan Jones

The British Library is launching a mega-project to preserve the UK's “digital memory”, writes Alice Jones.
 

9. "Relegation might be best for my club" (Independent)

Sunderland needs this new manager like a hole in the head, writes Chris Mullin.

10. Here's another job for your to-do list, Lord Hall... (Independent)

Restore arts at the BBC to their former glory, writes David Lister.

 

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Theresa May takes early lead in the Conservative leadership race

The first poll of the Tory contest puts the Home Secretary well out in front

Theresa May, the Home Secretary is well ahead among Conservative members according to a new YouGov poll for the Times

She is both the preferred first choice of a plurality of members from an open field (she secures 37 per cent of the vote, with her nearest rival, Boris Johnson, 10 points behind) and roundly trounces Johnson with 55 per cent to 38 per cent. In all other head-to-heads, Johnson wins comfortably.

Although YouGov have a patchy recent record in national contests - they predicted the London mayoral victory but failed to foresee the Conservative majority or the Brexit vote - they are four for four as far as internal party contests are concerned, having accurately predicted both the result and the final vote share of the 2015 and 2010 Labour leadership contests and the 2005 and 2001 Conservative contests. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.