Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Our hate figures and heroes are mere surfers on the tide of history (Independent)

From Thatcher to Mandela - history is not one grand soap opera, in which the characters at the top pull huge levers that dictate the fate of millions, writes Owen Jones. 

2. The right won on economics. Now for Act II (Times)

Writing on the subject of this week's New Statesman debate - "This house believes the left won the 20th century" - Tim Montgomerie says Communism was repudiated in the last century but conservatives are losing the culture wars to the left.

3. America’s problem is not political gridlock (Financial Times)

Throughout US history, division and slow change have been the norm rather than the exception, writes Larry Summers.

4. Thatcherism is no museum piece – it’s alive and kicking (Daily Telegraph)

Britain could benefit hugely from the astral guidance of its heroic former prime minister, says Boris Johnson.

5. Digital money talks, even when it trades in hats and hamburgers (Guardian)

The often bizarre trade in virtual goods exposes some timeless truths about human nature, writes NS deputy editor Helen Lewis. 

6. Spare a thought for the late unlamented one-nation Tory (Guardian)

Margaret Thatcher never represented all of her party, writes John Harris. But her legacy now obscures its centrist, socially concerned wing.

7. Has Cameron at last learnt Blair's lesson that the British are not naturally left-wing? (Daily Mail)

What the increasingly influential Lynton Crosby understands is that people want passionately to govern themselves in accordance with their own historic culture, writes Melanie Phillips.

8. Why the US is looking to Germany (Financial Times)

When it comes to the labour market, America is suffering from a rising case of ‘German envy’, says Edward Luce.

9. Spare a thought for the late unlamented one-nation Tory (Guardian)

Margaret Thatcher never represented all of her party, writes John Harris. But her legacy now obscures its centrist, socially concerned wing.

10. Secret arrests would be an affront to justice (Daily Telegraph)

Secret arrests, like secrecy of any kind, make for bad justice, says a Telegraph editorial. This wrong-headed proposal should be abandoned immediately. 

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Tom Watson rouses Labour's conference as he comes out fighting

The party's deputy leader exhilarated delegates with his paean to the Blair and Brown years. 

Tom Watson is down but not out. After Jeremy Corbyn's second landslide victory, and weeks of threats against his position, Labour's deputy leader could have played it safe. Instead, he came out fighting. 

With Corbyn seated directly behind him, he declared: "I don't know why we've been focusing on what was wrong with the Blair and Brown governments for the last six years. But trashing our record is not the way to enhance our brand. We won't win elections like that! And we need to win elections!" As Watson won a standing ovation from the hall and the platform, the Labour leader remained motionless. When a heckler interjected, Watson riposted: "Jeremy, I don't think she got the unity memo." Labour delegates, many of whom hail from the pre-Corbyn era, lapped it up.

Though he warned against another challenge to the leader ("we can't afford to keep doing this"), he offered a starkly different account of the party's past and its future. He reaffirmed Labour's commitment to Nato ("a socialist construct"), with Corbyn left isolated as the platform applauded. The only reference to the leader came when Watson recalled his recent PMQs victory over grammar schools. There were dissenting voices (Watson was heckled as he praised Sadiq Khan for winning an election: "Just like Jeremy Corbyn!"). But one would never have guessed that this was the party which had just re-elected Corbyn. 

There was much more to Watson's speech than this: a fine comic riff on "Saturday's result" (Ed Balls on Strictly), a spirited attack on Theresa May's "ducking and diving; humming and hahing" and a cerebral account of the automation revolution. But it was his paean to Labour history that roused the conference as no other speaker has. 

The party's deputy channelled the spirit of both Hugh Gaitskell ("fight, and fight, and fight again to save the party we love") and his mentor Gordon Brown (emulating his trademark rollcall of New Labour achivements). With his voice cracking, Watson recalled when "from the sunny uplands of increasing prosperity social democratic government started to feel normal to the people of Britain". For Labour, a party that has never been further from power in recent decades, that truly was another age. But for a brief moment, Watson's tubthumper allowed Corbyn's vanquished opponents to relive it. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.