Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Our hate figures and heroes are mere surfers on the tide of history (Independent)

From Thatcher to Mandela - history is not one grand soap opera, in which the characters at the top pull huge levers that dictate the fate of millions, writes Owen Jones. 

2. The right won on economics. Now for Act II (Times)

Writing on the subject of this week's New Statesman debate - "This house believes the left won the 20th century" - Tim Montgomerie says Communism was repudiated in the last century but conservatives are losing the culture wars to the left.

3. America’s problem is not political gridlock (Financial Times)

Throughout US history, division and slow change have been the norm rather than the exception, writes Larry Summers.

4. Thatcherism is no museum piece – it’s alive and kicking (Daily Telegraph)

Britain could benefit hugely from the astral guidance of its heroic former prime minister, says Boris Johnson.

5. Digital money talks, even when it trades in hats and hamburgers (Guardian)

The often bizarre trade in virtual goods exposes some timeless truths about human nature, writes NS deputy editor Helen Lewis. 

6. Spare a thought for the late unlamented one-nation Tory (Guardian)

Margaret Thatcher never represented all of her party, writes John Harris. But her legacy now obscures its centrist, socially concerned wing.

7. Has Cameron at last learnt Blair's lesson that the British are not naturally left-wing? (Daily Mail)

What the increasingly influential Lynton Crosby understands is that people want passionately to govern themselves in accordance with their own historic culture, writes Melanie Phillips.

8. Why the US is looking to Germany (Financial Times)

When it comes to the labour market, America is suffering from a rising case of ‘German envy’, says Edward Luce.

9. Spare a thought for the late unlamented one-nation Tory (Guardian)

Margaret Thatcher never represented all of her party, writes John Harris. But her legacy now obscures its centrist, socially concerned wing.

10. Secret arrests would be an affront to justice (Daily Telegraph)

Secret arrests, like secrecy of any kind, make for bad justice, says a Telegraph editorial. This wrong-headed proposal should be abandoned immediately. 

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“Brexit is based on racism”: Who is protesting outside the Supreme Court and what are they fighting for?

Movement for Justice is challenging the racist potential of Brexit, as the government appeals the High Court's Article 50 decision.

Protestors from the campaign group Movement for Justice are demonstrating outside the Supreme Court for the second day running. They are against the government triggering Article 50 without asking MPs, and are protesting against the Brexit vote in general. They plan to remain outside the Supreme Court for the duration of the case, as the government appeals the recent High Court ruling in favour of Parliament.

Their banners call to "STOP the scapgoating of immigrants", to "Build the movement against austerity & FOR equality", and to "Stop Brexit Fight Racism".

The group led Saturday’s march at Yarl’s Wood Immigration Detention Centre, where a crowd of over 2,000 people stood against the government’s immigration policy, and the management of the centre, which has long been under fire for claims of abuse against detainees.  

Movement for Justice, and its 50 campaigners, were in the company yesterday of people from all walks of pro and anti-Brexit life, including the hangers-on from former Ukip leader Nigel Farage’s postponed march on the Supreme Court.

Antonia Bright, one of the campaign’s lead figures, says: “It is in the interests of our fight for freedom of movement that the Supreme Court blocks May’s attempt to rush through an anti-immigrant deal.”

This sentiment is echoed by campaigners on both sides of the referendum, many of whom believe that Parliament should be involved.

Alongside refuting the royal prerogative, the group criticises the Brexit vote in general. Bright says:

“The bottom line is that Brexit represents an anti-immigrant movement. It is based on racism, so regardless of how people intended their vote, it will still be a decision that is an attack on immigration.”

A crucial concern for the group is that the terms of the agreement will set a precedent for anti-immigrant policies that will heighten aggression against ethnic communities.

This concern isn’t entirely unfounded. The National Police Chief’s Council recorded a 58 per cent spike in hate crimes in the week following the referendum. Over the course of the month, this averaged as a 41 per cent increase, compared with the same time the following year.

The subtext of Bright's statement is not only a dissatisfaction with the result of the EU referendum, but the process of the vote itself. It voices a concern heard many times since the vote that a referendum is far too simple a process for a desicion of such momentous consequences. She also draws on the gaping hole between people's voting intentions and the policy that is implemented.

This is particularly troubling when the competitive nature of multilateral bargaining allows the government to keep its cards close to its chest on critical issues such as freedom of movement and trade agreements. Bright insists that this, “is not a democratic process at all”.

“We want to positively say that there does need to be scrutiny and transparency, and an opening up of this question, not just a rushing through on the royal prerogative,” she adds. “There needs to be transparency in everything that is being negotiated and discussed in the public realm.”

For campaigners, the use of royal prerogative is a sinister symbol of the government deciding whatever it likes, without consulting Parliament or voters, during the future Brexit negotiations. A ruling in the Supreme Court in favour of a parliamentary vote would present a small but important reassurance against these fears.