Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The badger cull is no black-and-white issue (Telegraph)

The badger cull gets under way in two pilot areas - but there are huge questions about how effective and humane the mass killing will be, writes Geoffrey Lean

2. Why weird science is all in a day’s work (FT)

Stories of the formula for the perfect penalty kick are cheaper than ads, writes Tim Harford

3. How to tackle the EDL (Guardian)

Those wondering how to respond to English Defence League marches this weekend can look to the example of tea and non-confrontation we set at York mosque, writes Mohamed El-Gomati

4. Fiendish plots are a-hatching in Watford (Telegraph)

It's joy for conspiracy theorists as the Bilderberg Group meets again, says Matthew Norman

5. I celebrate the 'fuck you' behind Pussy Riot's eyes (Guardian)

As Maria Alyokhina's hunger strike continues, her strength inspires others as much as it scares the Russian state, writes Romola Garai

6. I want a little domestic dignitas (Telegraph)

When it comes to dying there’s no place like home, says Vicki Woods

 

7. Ministers who misuse statistics to mislead voters must pay the price (Guardian)

Politicians resign for fake expenses or receiving favours, but not for making false statements. They should be punished, writes Peter Wilby

8. America’s economy is about to take off (FT)

Things can still go wrong, but 2014 should be a year of greater cheer, writes Robin Harding

9. Nothing wrong with a revolving door (FT)

Critics of the former HMRC chief’s new role should not excoriate him, writes Howard Davies

10. Tories could solve Ukip puzzle in Brighton (Telegraph)

The city by the sea is just the place for a Tory revival, says Graeme Archer

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.