Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The badger cull is no black-and-white issue (Telegraph)

The badger cull gets under way in two pilot areas - but there are huge questions about how effective and humane the mass killing will be, writes Geoffrey Lean

2. Why weird science is all in a day’s work (FT)

Stories of the formula for the perfect penalty kick are cheaper than ads, writes Tim Harford

3. How to tackle the EDL (Guardian)

Those wondering how to respond to English Defence League marches this weekend can look to the example of tea and non-confrontation we set at York mosque, writes Mohamed El-Gomati

4. Fiendish plots are a-hatching in Watford (Telegraph)

It's joy for conspiracy theorists as the Bilderberg Group meets again, says Matthew Norman

5. I celebrate the 'fuck you' behind Pussy Riot's eyes (Guardian)

As Maria Alyokhina's hunger strike continues, her strength inspires others as much as it scares the Russian state, writes Romola Garai

6. I want a little domestic dignitas (Telegraph)

When it comes to dying there’s no place like home, says Vicki Woods

 

7. Ministers who misuse statistics to mislead voters must pay the price (Guardian)

Politicians resign for fake expenses or receiving favours, but not for making false statements. They should be punished, writes Peter Wilby

8. America’s economy is about to take off (FT)

Things can still go wrong, but 2014 should be a year of greater cheer, writes Robin Harding

9. Nothing wrong with a revolving door (FT)

Critics of the former HMRC chief’s new role should not excoriate him, writes Howard Davies

10. Tories could solve Ukip puzzle in Brighton (Telegraph)

The city by the sea is just the place for a Tory revival, says Graeme Archer

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What do Labour's lost voters make of the Labour leadership candidates?

What does Newsnight's focus group make of the Labour leadership candidates?

Tonight on Newsnight, an IpsosMori focus group of former Labour voters talks about the four Labour leadership candidates. What did they make of the four candidates?

On Andy Burnham:

“He’s the old guard, with Yvette Cooper”

“It’s the same message they were trying to portray right up to the election”​

“I thought that he acknowledged the fact that they didn’t say sorry during the time of the election, and how can you expect people to vote for you when you’re not actually acknowledging that you were part of the problem”​

“Strongish leader, and at least he’s acknowledging and saying let’s move on from here as opposed to wishy washy”

“I was surprised how long he’d been in politics if he was talking about Tony Blair years – he doesn’t look old enough”

On Jeremy Corbyn:

"“He’s the older guy with the grey hair who’s got all the policies straight out of the sixties and is a bit of a hippy as well is what he comes across as” 

“I agree with most of what he said, I must admit, but I don’t think as a country we can afford his principles”

“He was just going to be the opposite of Conservatives, but there might be policies on the Conservative side that, y’know, might be good policies”

“I’ve heard in the paper he’s the favourite to win the Labour leadership. Well, if that was him, then I won’t be voting for Labour, put it that way”

“I think he’s a very good politician but he’s unelectable as a Prime Minister”

On Yvette Cooper

“She sounds quite positive doesn’t she – for families and their everyday issues”

“Bedroom tax, working tax credits, mainly mum things as well”

“We had Margaret Thatcher obviously years ago, and then I’ve always thought about it being a man, I wanted a man, thinking they were stronger…  she was very strong and decisive as well”

“She was very clear – more so than the other guy [Burnham]”

“I think she’s trying to play down her economics background to sort of distance herself from her husband… I think she’s dumbing herself down”

On Liz Kendall

“None of it came from the heart”

“She just sounds like someone’s told her to say something, it’s not coming from the heart, she needs passion”

“Rather than saying what she’s going to do, she’s attacking”

“She reminded me of a headteacher when she was standing there, and she was quite boring. She just didn’t seem to have any sort of personality, and you can’t imagine her being a leader of a party”

“With Liz Kendall and Andy Burnham there’s a lot of rhetoric but there doesn’t seem to be a lot of direction behind what they’re saying. There seems to be a lot of words but no action.”

And, finally, a piece of advice for all four candidates, should they win the leadership election:

“Get down on your hands and knees and start praying”

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.