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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Throw out the myths about Margaret Thatcher (Guardian)

 

The reality was that Thatcher was neither popular nor successful economically, writes Ken Livingstone. Labour must make a clean break with her policies.

2. How Labour can answer Blair’s seven questions (Times)

To expand Labour's support, Miliband should be bolder on housing, welfare and land taxation, says New Statesman editor Jason Cowley.

3. Sulking Tony Blair should show Ed Miliband some of the loyalty he demanded (Daily Mirror)

Blair may have been the right man to lead Labour at the 1997 election after John Smith’s death but he was past his sell-by date before the 2005 election, says Kevin Maguire.

4. Britain should not go back to the future (Financial Times)

The UK has been left an economy with a remarkably late-19th century look, writes Martin Wolf.

5. Seven lessons from Thatcher for the Tories (Times)

Her failures as well as her successes are worth analysing, says Tim Montgomerie.

6. Thatcher listened to voters – now it’s Farage who hears their despair (Daily Telegraph)

Ukip is no longer a single-issue party, it is widening its scope and enjoys the common touch with core voters that the main parties lack, says Fraser Nelson. 

7. Benefits don't look quite the electoral winner Cameron presumed (Guardian)

Attitudes to welfare change once people understand the detail, writes Polly Toynbee. For all last week's sound and fury, Labour was 10 points ahead.

8. Back-seat driving is a risky business, especially for Tony Blair (Independent)

The former PM was positively Trappist during the Brown years, says an Independent editorial. Not anymore.

9. A prophecy of prosperity after the gloom (Daily Telegraph)

Keynes and Thatcher each knew that growth would return, and soon than others thought, says Jeremy Warner.

10. Margaret Thatcher: Corporation blues (Guardian)

Conservative hostility towards the BBC was a constant theme in the Thatcher era, notes a Guardian editorial. With her death there has been a fresh spike.