Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Lady Thatcher debate a battle over Britain's present and future (Guardian)

Make no mistake, the politicised contest about how to remember the former prime minister is not about the past, writes Jonathan Freedland.

2. The ghost of Margaret Thatcher will haunt David Cameron until he shows he can win an election (Independent)

The unusually large band of 148 new Tory MPs elected in 2010 are very much 'Thatcher’s children', writes Andrew Grice.

3. The selfish left, not Thatcher, divided us (Times) (£)

In the 20 years before her time in office, the nation endured far more conflict than in the 20 years after it, argues Daniel Finkelstein.

4. Margaret Thatcher: Respect for the dead is an outdated and foolish principle (Independent)

Let us say what we think, and be frank about it: death does not confer privilege, writes A.C. Grayling.

5. The radical Mrs Thatcher is still inspiring today's Conservatives (Daily Telegraph)

Margaret Thatcher proved you can change minds by the force of ideas, says Conservative MP Liz Truss.

6. In this nuclear standoff, it's the US that's the rogue state (Guardian)

The use of threats and isolation against Iran and North Korea is a bizarre, perilous way to conduct foreign relations, says Jonathan Steele.

7. Japan’s unfinished policy revolution (Financial Times)

Tokyo’s economic system is a machine for generating high private savings, writes Martin Wolf. 

8. Margaret Thatcher was no feminist (Guardian)

Far from 'smashing the glass ceiling', Thatcher made it through and pulled the ladder up after her, says Hadley Freeman.

9. Thatcher's economic reforms influenced the world, but the next big changes won't come from Britain (Independent)

Once upon a time we exported Thatcherism; in the near future, we will find ourselves reimporting an Indian and Chinese version of it, writes Hamish McRae.

10. Hollande must heed lessons of Louis XVI (Financial Times)

France’s president may come to be the victim of a revolt against elites, writes Dominique Moïsi.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.