Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In France, Hollande is losing the battle for the eurozone (Guardian)

The president's woes matter outside France, says Jonathan Fenby. The failure of his anti-austerity pledge has left the balance of power with Germany.

2. Heroes and history keep red flags flying high (Times)

Manchester United’s global appeal is fuelled by ideals and romance, which also sustains parties of the left, writes Tim Montgomerie.

3. Britain now has one selfish class (Financial Times)

There is no sense of mission to this modern middle class, writes Tristram Hunt.

4. Migrants get jobs because they work harder than us (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s education policies left our young people lacking the skills or ambition to compete, writes Boris Johnson.

5. The UN should put North Korea in the dock at the Hague (Guardian)

The UN should treat Kim Jong-un's threat as a crime against humanity, and refer it to the ICC, says Geoffrey Robertson.

6. Don’t get violins out for useless bankers (Sun)

Every saver in Britain needs to know they can rely on the measures promised and introduced since the last crash to protect them from the next, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

7. Timid US visa reform will deter workers (Financial Times)

The H1B visa manages to annoy everyone, writes Edward Luce.

8. Lee Halpin's tragic story shows the terrible plight of the homeless - but does anybody care? (Independent)

We are slyly slipping back from the caring society that founded Crisis and Shelter to one holding Victorian attitudes to work, poverty and misfortune, says Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

9. Warning. This article on gay marriage contains optimism (Guardian)

Gay rights' first activists never imagined that it would go politically mainstream, as it has now, says Gary Younge. But they fought anyway.

10. It is too late to preserve the old Royal Mail (Daily Telegraph)

Campaigners are right to say that the postal services are in jeopardy, but it is difficult to make the case for a rethink when privatisation is long overdue, says a Telegraph editorial. 

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.