Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In France, Hollande is losing the battle for the eurozone (Guardian)

The president's woes matter outside France, says Jonathan Fenby. The failure of his anti-austerity pledge has left the balance of power with Germany.

2. Heroes and history keep red flags flying high (Times)

Manchester United’s global appeal is fuelled by ideals and romance, which also sustains parties of the left, writes Tim Montgomerie.

3. Britain now has one selfish class (Financial Times)

There is no sense of mission to this modern middle class, writes Tristram Hunt.

4. Migrants get jobs because they work harder than us (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s education policies left our young people lacking the skills or ambition to compete, writes Boris Johnson.

5. The UN should put North Korea in the dock at the Hague (Guardian)

The UN should treat Kim Jong-un's threat as a crime against humanity, and refer it to the ICC, says Geoffrey Robertson.

6. Don’t get violins out for useless bankers (Sun)

Every saver in Britain needs to know they can rely on the measures promised and introduced since the last crash to protect them from the next, says Trevor Kavanagh. 

7. Timid US visa reform will deter workers (Financial Times)

The H1B visa manages to annoy everyone, writes Edward Luce.

8. Lee Halpin's tragic story shows the terrible plight of the homeless - but does anybody care? (Independent)

We are slyly slipping back from the caring society that founded Crisis and Shelter to one holding Victorian attitudes to work, poverty and misfortune, says Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

9. Warning. This article on gay marriage contains optimism (Guardian)

Gay rights' first activists never imagined that it would go politically mainstream, as it has now, says Gary Younge. But they fought anyway.

10. It is too late to preserve the old Royal Mail (Daily Telegraph)

Campaigners are right to say that the postal services are in jeopardy, but it is difficult to make the case for a rethink when privatisation is long overdue, says a Telegraph editorial. 

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.