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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. Where's the real threat here – Kim Jong-un or Trident? (Guardian)

What we should be scared of is not the North Korean's belicosity but how it's being used to subvert domestic politics in the west, says Simon Jenkins.

2. Bank of Japan follows the Fed, on steroids (Financial Times)

The strategy may break the deflationary psyche – but it could work too well, writes Gavyn Davies.

3. Martine White is a product of welfare, not Mick Philpott (Guardian)

George Osborne is fighting back, aware that tax cuts for the rich and benefit cuts for the frail shock even natural conservatives, writes Polly Toynbee. But this is just the start.

4. Labour can’t win if it’s on Mick Philpott’s side (Times)

The voters have decided that we spend too much on welfare, says Philip Collins. Miliband must offer them more than silence in reply.

5. Philpott wasn't a symbol of Welfare UK, but blame the state for letting his depravity go unchecked (Independent)

In this so-called liberal age, we betray children by a refusal to pass the judgement which would allow us to protect them, says Ann Widdecombe.

6. On welfare, IDS is the heir to Gordon Brown (Daily Telegraph)

Iain Duncan Smith's benefit reforms mark the final nail in the coffin for Beveridge's contributory principle, argues Jeremy Warner.

7. Don’t blame the HBOS bankers, blame the politicians (Daily Telegraph)

Today's indictment of the men who brought HBOS to its knees should extend well beyond them, says Fraser Nelson.

8. Where are the activists as austerity bites? They have been beaten back (Guardian)

Protesters face violence, arrest and serious charges, writes Laurie Penny. Only the brave dare face this savage suppression.

9. The posturing boy despot who could blunder into apocalypse (Daily Mail)

Western intelligence officials believe it is the desire to leave his mark that lies behind Kim Jong-un’s seemingly unprovoked bellicosity towards the US, writes Michael Burleigh. 

10. Spend and borrow will not save the left (Financial Times)

The welfare state was built on growth, writes Philip Stephens. That is what social democrats should focus on.