Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Don't be fooled: Iain Duncan Smith’s attack on pensioners is really an attack on all of us (Independent)

This is where the shredding of universalism ends up, promoting poisonous ideas of the 'undeserving poor' and the further destruction of Britain’s social cohesion, writes Owen Jones.

2. Labour's recovery position (Guardian)

To win in 2015, Labour needs to show it can link economic growth with rising living standards, writes Gavin Kelly.

3. Team Cameron must put some tiger in his tank (Times)

If the Conservatives are to have a chance in the coming elections, the Prime Minister needs a grittier message, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. Steps to save Syria from desperate Assad (Financial Times)

The world is witnessing a regime struggling for its own survival, writes David Gardner.

5. Keep calm, everyone – now is not the time to do a Nicolas Cage (Daily Telegraph)

Far from being bad news, the rise of UKIP is actually a good sign for the Conservative Party, says Boris Johnson.

6. A nudge and a nag won't end our throwaway culture (Guardian)

Of course food waste is a scandal, writes Peter Wilby. But instead of tackling wider structural issues, Tories mess with the content of our fridges.

7. Ignorance in the shale war (Financial Times)

Local communities should share in the benefits of exploration, says an FT editorial.

8. Australia's boom is anything but for its Aboriginal people (Guardian)

The story of the first Australians is still poverty and humiliation, while their land yields the world's biggest resources boom, writes John Pilger.

9. ‘The Kippers’ joke is now on Tories (Sun)

The PM must lock the next government into an early referendum — whoever wins the election, says Trevor Kavanagh.

10. It’s not a snoopers’ charter, it’s a life-saver (Daily Telegraph)

A new Communications Data Bill is a vital part of the fight against crime and terrorism, argues Alex Carlile.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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