Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Don't get mad about the Mail's use of the Philpotts to tarnish the poor – get even (Guardian)

30 years of widening inequality have built a Tory Narnia riven by distrust, writes Zoe Williams. It doesn't have to be like this.

2. The PM's critics are wrong. He’s on the verge of something great (Daily Telegraph)

A revolution is under way in health, welfare and education that may change Britain forever, says Peter Oborne.

3. We can’t limit free speech. Even for Di Canio (Times)

Once I proclaimed ‘no platform for fascists’, writes David Aaronovitch. Now I can see that toleration is a far more potent weapon.

4. We need a nuclear deterrent more than ever (Daily Telegraph)

A credible and continuous independent nuclear deterrent remains a crucial component of our national security, argues David Cameron.

5. Trident: the nuclear jobcentre (Guardian)

Treating Trident as an employment scheme will leave Britain ill equipped for the real threat: terrorism, says Richard Norton-Taylor.

6. Gove and the unions are betraying our children (Independent)

Their noisy debate leaves parents aghast at what awaits our children in the classroom, writes Jane Merrick.

7. Cleaner politics in France (Financial Times)

Hollande’s move to raise standards is overdue, says an FT editorial.

8. Real Time Information may be a reform too far (Daily Telegraph)

Whitehall’s record does not fill us with confidence that a major IT reform to the PAYE system will be handled well, says a Telegraph editorial.

9. Financial reform is coming to America (Financial Times)

It is no longer in the interests of Obama’s critics to delay, writes Barney Frank.

10. Don't make a martyr of Bradley Manning (Guardian)

The US should be a beacon of justice, not a bully, writes PJ Crowley. Any further pursuit of Manning is a propaganda gift to the country's enemies.

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Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.