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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Vote Red Ed, get Red Len as the Labour dinosaurs roar back to life (Daily Mail)

The McCluskey intervention sums up how little has changed in Labour since its dark, wilderness years of the 1980s, says Simon Heffer.

2. Will Merkel be the Abe Lincoln of her age? (Daily Telegraph)

The fate of Europe – and Britain – depends on what the German Chancellor does next, says Jeremy Warner.

3. Miliband believes the age of Ed began in 2008 (Times)

The truth is that the Labour leader will do politics the same as everyone else, but he will try to do economics differently, writes Philip Collins.

4. More reform, less austerity for Europe (Financial Times)

The War of the Coding Error is a reminder that the economy is too vital to be left to economists, says Philip Stephens.

5. At last, it’s official: spending more doesn’t make public services better (Daily Telegraph)

New research suggests that cutting government down to size will leave Britain stronger and more socially cohesive, writes Fraser Nelson.

6. Press regulation: Time for a ceasefire (Guardian)

The few who still understand the arguments about the post-Leveson royal charter are dead, mad or past caring, says a Guardian editorial.

7. Turning the Page (Times)

An independent Royal Charter would ensure press regulation that was robust and independent but still voluntary and consistent with a free press, says a Times editorial.

8. The important lessons China has for the world (Independent)

A US billlionaire is setting up a $300m scholarship scheme at to fund Americans studying Shanghai’s elite Tsinghua University, writes Peter Popham. But what will they actually learn?

9. The pros and cons of a floating currency (Financial Times)

The UK has monetary and fiscal policy autonomy but had little adjustment in the current account, writes Martin Wolf.

10. As an old empire emerges from Europe's new alliances, Cameron will be left behind (Independent)

If the PM thinks he can ally himself with the ‘new Europeans’ to reform the EU, he has another thing coming, says Mary Dejevsky. These countries now have their own agenda.