Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband the illusionist must conjure up more with less (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour Party must convince the voters that saving money can produce social dividends, says Mary Riddell.

2. It's time the Tories learned to love the unions (Guardian)

Nostalgia for a tussle with the unions still excites some, writes David Skelton. But modern Conservatives need to befriend, not alienate them.

3. Austerity loses an article of faith (Financial Times)

The UK industrial revolution shows the Reinhart-Rogoff thesis on debt is not always right, says Martin Wolf.

4. Even if he loses, Alex Salmond will still win (Times)

Whichever way Scotland votes on independence, the First Minister will wrest more power away from Westminster, writes Alice Thomson. 

5. Shaker Aamer and the dirty secrets of the war on terror (Guardian)

The scandal of Britain's last Guantánamo inmate encapsulates the barbarity of a mutating conflict without end, says Seumas Milne.

6. Sovereign Scots may have to drop sterling (Financial Times)

Edinburgh should try to secure monetary union with England, but it would probably fail, argues John Kay.

7. France's meltdown is a stark warning to anyone who wants Red Ed as PM (Daily Mail)

Labour is promising precisely the same policies as Hollande’s socialists, writes Daniel Hannan.

8. If Abenomics works, Britain's leaders will look like monkeys (Guardian)

George Osborne should abandon the tribal morality of austerity and, like Japan, print money not for banks but for people, says Simon Jenkins.

9. A state-sector version of Eton is long overdue (Independent)

But it is not clear that the practicalities of the Durand scheme have been thought through, says an Independent editorial.

10. Our US protector is looking the other way (Daily Telegraph)

The free-riding nations of Europe are making a big mistake by slashing their defence budgets, argues David Blair.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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