Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband the illusionist must conjure up more with less (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour Party must convince the voters that saving money can produce social dividends, says Mary Riddell.

2. It's time the Tories learned to love the unions (Guardian)

Nostalgia for a tussle with the unions still excites some, writes David Skelton. But modern Conservatives need to befriend, not alienate them.

3. Austerity loses an article of faith (Financial Times)

The UK industrial revolution shows the Reinhart-Rogoff thesis on debt is not always right, says Martin Wolf.

4. Even if he loses, Alex Salmond will still win (Times)

Whichever way Scotland votes on independence, the First Minister will wrest more power away from Westminster, writes Alice Thomson. 

5. Shaker Aamer and the dirty secrets of the war on terror (Guardian)

The scandal of Britain's last Guantánamo inmate encapsulates the barbarity of a mutating conflict without end, says Seumas Milne.

6. Sovereign Scots may have to drop sterling (Financial Times)

Edinburgh should try to secure monetary union with England, but it would probably fail, argues John Kay.

7. France's meltdown is a stark warning to anyone who wants Red Ed as PM (Daily Mail)

Labour is promising precisely the same policies as Hollande’s socialists, writes Daniel Hannan.

8. If Abenomics works, Britain's leaders will look like monkeys (Guardian)

George Osborne should abandon the tribal morality of austerity and, like Japan, print money not for banks but for people, says Simon Jenkins.

9. A state-sector version of Eton is long overdue (Independent)

But it is not clear that the practicalities of the Durand scheme have been thought through, says an Independent editorial.

10. Our US protector is looking the other way (Daily Telegraph)

The free-riding nations of Europe are making a big mistake by slashing their defence budgets, argues David Blair.

Carl Court/Getty
Show Hide image

To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland