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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour's clarity may be its undoing (Financial Times)

Miliband is not guilty of nebulousness – he is an astonishingly clear politician, writes Janan Ganesh.

2. Teacher-bashing: a political sport with no winners (Guardian)

It's pupils, not performance-related pay, that motivate teachers – as I learned from a day in charge of a class in a Liverpool school, says Polly Toynbee.

3. France should shun talk of revolution (Financial Times)

The public mood is dark but the country’s situation is not so bad, says Gideon Rachman.

4. Don’t expect decisions from deserted No 10 (Times)

With so many advisers leaving Downing Street, there is a lack of energy and ideas at the centre of power, writes Rachel Sylvester.

5. Young appmakers can't count on a job for life (Guardian)

Brits force-fed the language of enterprise and no-jobs-for-life are now putting it into practice and getting precisely nowhere, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

6. The PM should be wary of the heirs to the Knights of the Shire (Daily Telegraph)

Today's Tory MPs are far less predictable - and manageable - than their forebears, says Bruce Anderson

7. Pensioners too must take a share of the pain (Times)

Most elderly people are no longer poor, writes Andrew Harrop. We must stop giving them special treatment.

8. We eurozoners must create a United State of Europe (Guardian)

Only a single Anglo-American style fiscal and military union can save the EU, says Brendan Simms. 

9. Two cheers for modern British democracy (Independent)

The Select Committees are stronger than ever and the post-2010, post-expenses scandal, intake is less deferential, especially on the Tory side, writes Donald Macintyre.

10. The growing cry for England and St George (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians should take note of the resurgence of English national identity, says Philip Johnston.