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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What Titanium Ed Miliband and the Iron Lady have in common (Daily Telegraph)

With his love of bold ideas, the Labour leader is a pretender to the Thatcher legacy, writes Mary Riddell.

2. Cameron cannot revive Thatcherism (Financial Times)

The alliance of beliefs that formed an ideology no longer exists, says Richard Vinen.

3. After the bomb, mass hysteria is the Boston terrorist's greatest weapon (Guardian)

A Chinese proverb bids us ask what the enemy most wants us to do, writes Simon Jenkins. Boston's bomber craves publicity, reaction and retaliation.

4. How central banks beat deflation (Financial Times)

The success of inflation targeting gives policy makers room to risk expansionary measures, says Martin Wolf.

5. Today we bury the last prime minister of WWII (Times) (£)

Margaret Thatcher’s world view was formed by the fight against Hitler, writes Daniel Finkelstein. Now her generation has finally left the stage.

6. Boston bombings: resilience in the face of horror (Guardian)

Pressure for answers will inevitably grow, but what matters is due process, and answers that can stand up in court, says a Guardian editorial.

7. The 'socialist firebrand' Derek Hatton screwed Liverpool just as much as Margaret Thatcher did (Independent)

Thatcher may have neglected Liverpool in the first half of the 1980s, but Hatton and Militant’s grip on my city set progress back a generation, says Jane Merrick.

8. What Cameron must learn from the Lady (Daily Mail)

What Thatcher understood so well is that votes flow from doing what is right – not from merely trying to be popular, says a Daily Mail editorial.

9. It's time to bury not just Thatcher – but Thatcherism (Guardian)

She didn't save Britain or turn the economy round, says Seumas Milne. We need to break with her failed model to escape its baleful consequences.

10. Like the French, our ministers should declare their assets (Independent)

Where François Hollande has led, David Cameron should follow, says an Independent editorial.