Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Don't get mad about the Mail's use of the Philpotts to tarnish the poor – get even (Guardian)

30 years of widening inequality have built a Tory Narnia riven by distrust, writes Zoe Williams. It doesn't have to be like this.

2. The PM's critics are wrong. He’s on the verge of something great (Daily Telegraph)

A revolution is under way in health, welfare and education that may change Britain forever, says Peter Oborne.

3. We can’t limit free speech. Even for Di Canio (Times)

Once I proclaimed ‘no platform for fascists’, writes David Aaronovitch. Now I can see that toleration is a far more potent weapon.

4. We need a nuclear deterrent more than ever (Daily Telegraph)

A credible and continuous independent nuclear deterrent remains a crucial component of our national security, argues David Cameron.

5. Trident: the nuclear jobcentre (Guardian)

Treating Trident as an employment scheme will leave Britain ill equipped for the real threat: terrorism, says Richard Norton-Taylor.

6. Gove and the unions are betraying our children (Independent)

Their noisy debate leaves parents aghast at what awaits our children in the classroom, writes Jane Merrick.

7. Cleaner politics in France (Financial Times)

Hollande’s move to raise standards is overdue, says an FT editorial.

8. Real Time Information may be a reform too far (Daily Telegraph)

Whitehall’s record does not fill us with confidence that a major IT reform to the PAYE system will be handled well, says a Telegraph editorial.

9. Financial reform is coming to America (Financial Times)

It is no longer in the interests of Obama’s critics to delay, writes Barney Frank.

10. Don't make a martyr of Bradley Manning (Guardian)

The US should be a beacon of justice, not a bully, writes PJ Crowley. Any further pursuit of Manning is a propaganda gift to the country's enemies.

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#heterosexualprideday happened, and it’s rather depressing

It may have been a publicity stunt – but some of the responses are still worrying.

Waking up to the news Michael Gove would be running for the Tory premiership, I thought my daily share of bad news was out the way. Seeing "Heterosexual Pride Day" trending on Twitter made me think otherwise.

LGBT Pride Month in the United States is being celebrated throughout June, with many cities across the country celebrating pride events. Pride in London took place last weekend.

But the hashtag began in the US. This post, by @_JackNForTweets, appeared yesterday.

And despite the broad condemnation it elicited, some voiced their support of the hashtag.

The originator of the tweet later gloated about the furore it created.

Before firing off some more vitriol.

The timing, of course, is unsavoury. Not three weeks have passed since the deadly Orlando shooting – the worst in recent US history – in which 49 people were killed at an LGBT nightclub. In response to the attack, commemorative vigils were held around the world. 

Sensitivity to the specifically homophobic nature of the attack has been questioned within the media's coverage of the event. The day after the attack, Owen Jones walked out of Sky News interview.

Despite this, many have voiced their opposition to the hashtag.

Regardless of whether the hashtag was purely designed for clickbait, the more worrying thing is the traction of support it gained.