Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A welfare crisis engulfs the nation, but Labour sits idly by (Daily Telegraph)

Caution has served Ed Miliband well so far, but the time has come for more than rhetoric, says Mary Riddell.

2. Why China’s economy might topple (Financial Times)

As Japan has shown, shifting to a lower-growth model is risky, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Tunisia and Egypt need the Arab revolutions to spread (Guardian)

Conflict over religion and identity risks diverting attention from the battle for social justice and national independence, writes Seumas Milne.

4. The Ed Miliband experiment has been tried before. Remember Gordon Brown? (Independent)

The worst outcome of the next election would be for Labour to win it so ill-prepared, says John Rentoul.

5. Welfare state can be cheaper and popular (Financial Times)

To satisfy deficit hawks and social justice doves a radical reshaping is needed, writes Graeme Cooke.

6. European Union: time to get aboard (Guardian)

Britain ought to be playing a more active role than this self-isolation permits, says a Guardian editorial.

7. North Korean missile crisis? Remember Cuba (Times)

It’s easy to dismiss Pyongyang’s threats as empty rhetoric, says Daniel Finkelstein. Postwar history should teach us to take the noise seriously.

8. Tell youngsters the truth: the UK needs you to work not go to university (Daily Telegraph)

The decision to massively increase the number of school-leavers going to university ranks as one of the greatest social and industrial policy blunders of recent decades, argues Allister Heath. 

9. A gurning DG and the question of bias (Daily Mail)

Seen through the BBC prism, every modest attempt to trim public spending is a wanton act of cruelty, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. The religious side of Easter seemed to pass almost unnoticed (Independent)

Not so long ago almost everything shut down on Good Friday and Easter Sunday, notes Mary Dejevsky.

#Match4Lara
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#Match4Lara: Lara has found her match, but the search for mixed-race donors isn't over

A UK blood cancer charity has seen an "unprecedented spike" in donors from mixed race and ethnic minority backgrounds since the campaign started. 

Lara Casalotti, the 24-year-old known round the world for her family's race to find her a stem cell donor, has found her match. As long as all goes ahead as planned, she will undergo a transplant in March.

Casalotti was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia in December, and doctors predicted that she would need a stem cell transplant by April. As I wrote a few weeks ago, her Thai-Italian heritage was a stumbling block, both thanks to biology (successful donors tend to fit your racial profile), and the fact that mixed-race people only make up around 3 per cent of international stem cell registries. The number of non-mixed minorities is also relatively low. 

That's why Casalotti's family launched a high profile campaign in the US, Thailand, Italy and the US to encourage more people - especially those from mixed or minority backgrounds - to register. It worked: the family estimates that upwards of 20,000 people have signed up through the campaign in less than a month.

Anthony Nolan, the blood cancer charity, also reported an "unprecedented spike" of donors from black, Asian, ethcnic minority or mixed race backgrounds. At certain points in the campaign over half of those signing up were from these groups, the highest proportion ever seen by the charity. 

Interestingly, it's not particularly likely that the campaign found Casalotti her match. Patient confidentiality regulations protect the nationality and identity of the donor, but Emily Rosselli from Anthony Nolan tells me that most patients don't find their donors through individual campaigns: 

 It’s usually unlikely that an individual finds their own match through their own campaign purely because there are tens of thousands of tissue types out there and hundreds of people around the world joining donor registers every day (which currently stand at 26 million).

Though we can't know for sure, it's more likely that Casalotti's campaign will help scores of people from these backgrounds in future, as it has (and may continue to) increased donations from much-needed groups. To that end, the Match4Lara campaign is continuing: the family has said that drives and events over the next few weeks will go ahead. 

You can sign up to the registry in your country via the Match4Lara website here.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.