Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The worst thing the Tories can do is catch the Ukip bug (Guardian)

Eastleigh punished Cameron for not finishing his modernisation project, says Jonathan Freedland. Now Conservative voters have somewhere else to go.

2. The case of Brussels and banker bonuses (Financial Times)

Europe has found a way to attack the UK that is sure to be favoured by much of the British public, writes Martin Wolf.

3. Two fingers up, but government not down (Times) (£)

The Eastleigh result means Clegg can still work with Cameron, writes Matthew Parris. That’s more important than any UKIP protest vote.

4. I used to argue when people said 'all parties are all the same’. I don’t now (Daily Telegraph)

Voters are punishing politicians who have lost touch with normal human instincts, says Charles Moore.

5. We have a long way to go before our immigration system is fair and simple (Independent)

I support tough controls on immigration, but the government has focused on the wrong end of the stick, says Labour's shadow immigration minister Chris Bryant.

6. Can Cameron prove himself a winner? (Daily Telegraph)

A new path to prosperity is the only means by which the Prime Minister and the Chancellor can return the Tories to favour, says a Telegraph editorial.

7. The west babbles on, and Assad is the winner (Independent)

Talks in Rome did nothing to hide the fact Syria's people have been betrayed, says Robert Fisk.

8. Grotesque myth that Red Ed leads a 'one nation' party (Daily Mail)

This electoral snub proves the party’s complete disconnection from hard-pressed and striving voters in the south of England, says Simon Heffer.

9. Beware of misreading Eastleigh result (Financial Times)

The by-election is a political, not electoral, problem for David Cameron, writes Robert Shrimsley.

10. What Labour could learn from Hollywood (Guardian)

Persona is as important in politics as it is in the movies, writes Marina Hyde. If only Ed Miliband would dump Ed Balls and recast Alistair Darling.

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Donald Trump's healthcare failure could be to his advantage

The appearance of weakness is less electorally damaging than actually removing healthcare from millions of people.

Good morning. Is it all over for Donald Trump? His approval ratings have cratered to below 40%. Now his attempt to dismantle Barack Obama's healthcare reforms have hit serious resistance from within the Republican Party, adding to the failures and retreats of his early days in office.

The problem for the GOP is that their opposition to Obamacare had more to do with the word "Obama" than the word "care". The previous President opted for a right-wing solution to the problem of the uninsured in a doomed attempt to secure bipartisan support for his healthcare reform. The politician with the biggest impact on the structures of the Affordable Care Act is Mitt Romney.

But now that the Republicans control all three branches of government they are left in a situation where they have no alternative to Obamacare that wouldn't either a) shred conservative orthodoxies on healthcare or b) create numerous and angry losers in their constituencies. The difficulties for Trump's proposal is that it does a bit of both.

Now the man who ran on his ability to cut a deal has been forced to make a take it or leave plea to Republicans in the House of Representatives: vote for this plan or say goodbye to any chance of repealing Obamacare.

But that's probably good news for Trump. The appearance of weakness and failure is less electorally damaging than actually succeeding in removing healthcare from millions of people, including people who voted for Trump.

Trump won his first term because his own negatives as a candidate weren't quite enough to drag him down on a night when he underperformed Republican candidates across the country. The historical trends all make it hard for a first-term incumbent to lose. So far, Trump's administration is largely being frustrated by the Republican establishment though he is succeeding in leveraging the Presidency for the benefit of his business empire.

But it may be that in the failure to get anything done he succeeds in once again riding Republican coattails to victory in 2020.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.